No, it’s not what Apple users buy stuff with. (Yet.)

Come and see what it is actually about – iPhone not required.

iCash

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Happy PAPERBACK BOOK DAY!

“Portable and relatively cheap, paperback books were to the 19th century what ebooks are to today.”

– Me, 20 minutes ago while thinking of what to write in this post

Paperback

Close your eyes and imagine… Wait. This isn’t going to work, you need your eyes to read.

Leave your eyes open and imagine yourself in the 1800s. You’re at a railroad station somewhere in Iowa or Illinois and you are bidding friends and family farewell as you prepare to board a train bound for Silver Bow, Montana. That’s where your great Aunt Minnie lives with her two tomcats, Trevor and Leroy, and you’re going to stay with her for the summer… but we’re getting off topic. The trip is going to take somewhere in the neighborhood of 3 weeks. There won’t be much to do. You’re going to need something to read.

But books are expensive and heavy. What are you to do? Wait! What’s this? Paperback books for sale! Cheap, comparatively light and portable, and fun (not a lot of stuffy academic stuff makes it to paperback). Thank goodness, your sanity is saved!

A couple of hundred years later, the story is still largely the same. Perhaps ebooks have stolen some of their thunder and maybe you won’t be putting them out to impress company with how fancy and well read you are but paperback books are still cheaper and lighter than their hardcover counterparts. And they are still fun to read, mostly anyway (some of that aforementioned stuffy academic stuff has started to turn up as oversize paperbacks, but to each there own). Somewhere along the line we have all read and loved a paperback, whether it was picked up at the last minute before catching that long flight or passed on to you from a friend that said you really, really needed to read it. So let’s all take a moment today to appreciate the importance of the paperback, not just in literary history, but to each of us.

 

New Ditto!

Did you know that the word ditto is borrowed from the Italian word for “said”, which was in turn derived from the Latin word for “said”? It turns out to have ancient origins; noble roots even. Classy.

Alexander Hamilton Shelf End Ditto

 

Learn Your Library Resources – Consumer Health Complete

Consumer Health Complete

Consumer Health Complete supports the information needs of patients and fosters an overall understanding of health-related topics. This resource provides content covering all key areas of health and wellness, from mainstream medicine to the many perspectives of complementary and holistic medicine. You can find in on the list of “Catalogs & Databases” on our website. All you need is your library card number to log into the resource.

Content Includes

  • More than 500 full-text journals and magazines
  • More than 240 full-text health reference books and encyclopedias
  • More than 2,600 full-text evidence-based health reports
  • Nearly 500 medical images and diagrams
  • Nearly 250 animations with audio narration
  • Dozens of articles covering teen health topics
  • Full-text consumer health pamphlets and leaflets

Subjects Include

  • Aging
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Drugs and alcohol
  • Fitness
  • Nutrition and dietetics

Books to Film

Upcoming Movies Based on Books

The Coldest City by Antony Johnston (aka Atomic Blonde: The Coldest City)

The Coldest CityAtomic BlondeWhen it comes out: July 28

What the book is about: November 1989. Communism is collapsing, and soon the Berlin Wall will come down with it. But before that happens there is one last bit of cloak & dagger to attend to. Two weeks ago, an undercover MI6 officer was killed in Berlin. He was carrying a list that allegedly contains the name of every espionage agent working in Berlin, on all sides. No list was found on his body. Now Lorraine Broughton, an experienced spy with no pre-existing ties to Berlin, has been sent into this powderkeg of social unrest, counter-espionage, defections gone bad and secret assassinations to bring back the list and save the lives of the British agents whose identities reside on it.

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

The Glass CastleThe Glass Castle_filmWhen it comes out: August 11

What the book is about: When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family. So, the Walls children learned to take care of themselves.

Tulip Fever by Deborah Moggach

Tulip FeverTulip Fever_filmWhen it comes out: August 25

What the book is about: In 1630s Amsterdam, tulipomania has seized the populace. Everywhere men are seduced by the fantastic exotic flower. But for wealthy merchant Cornelis Sandvoort, it is his young and beautiful wife, Sophia, who stirs his soul. He yearns for an heir, but so far he and Sophia have failed to produce one. In a bid for immortality, he commissions a portrait of them both by the talented young painter Jan van Loos. But as Van Loos begins to capture Sophia’s likeness on canvas, a slow passion begins to burn between the beautiful young wife and the talented artist.

Genre Friday – Rampant Technology Horror

Toaster

Like this except, you know, evil.

It’s late, the wind is howling outside, you’re all alone in the house… and then your computer comes to life with malevolent intelligence and takes over all your appliances. Next thing you know your chased screaming from your home with sinister kitchen appliances and a surprisingly angry vacuum cleaner close on your heels only to find your lawn mower and snow blower waiting to ambush you in the front yard. Through the creative and unrestrained use of a shovel and framing hammer (thank goodness the simple tools haven’t turned against you) and running, lots of running, you manage to barely survive the night.

We’ve all been there.

Rampant Technology Horror (aka “The machines are alive and killing everyone!”) is a small but memorable horror subgenre dealing with exactly what it sounds like – technology and machines that have either taken on a life of their own or are being controlled by some mysterious outside force and subsequently turned on their erstwhile masters. It all exploits the fear that man has gone too far and dared too much, creating machines and technology that we can no longer understand (who knows how an iPad works? *crickets*), let alone control. The best (read most ridiculous and therefore entertaining) of the subgenre, in my humble opinion, comes from the late 70s to early 90s when it was all evil automobiles (see Stephen King’s film Maximum Overdrive, based on his short story Trucks) and horrifying home appliances (again, Stephen King provides an example with his story The Mangle about a violent washing machine). Once the digital age was upon us and computers became a household item though they stole the limelight and it all became frighteningly plausible.