12 THE HATE U GIVE Quotes that Need to Be in the Movie

The Hate U GiveIf you’ve been following us here at Book Riot even a little, you’ll have a fair idea of just how in love we are with Angie Thomas’s YA debut novel, The Hate U Give. The book follows Starr Carter, a 16-year-old black girl whose world changes after she witnesses her best friend being shot. The book hit the New York Times Bestseller List, inspired hundreds of young activists, and believe it or not, was banned by some authorities and institutions across the U.S.

If you haven’t had a chance to pick up this beautiful, heartbreaking marvel of a book, you have around a month before we are blessed with the movie adaptation, starring Amandla Stenberg, KJ Apa, Issa Rae, and Regina Hall. The book has everything, from profound words about black activism and police brutality to cozy, quippy family banter. I have no doubt the movie will be a gorgeous inspiring tearjerker, and here are some of my favourite The Hate U Give quotes I’d love to see come to life.

  1. Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.
  2. What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?
  3. Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.
  4. You can destroy wood and brick, but you can’t destroy a movement.
  5. Your voices matter, your dreams matter, your lives matter. Be the roses that grow in the concrete.
  6. ‘Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared, Starr,’ she says. ‘It means you go on even though you’re scared. And you’re doing that.’
  7. I’ll never forget. I’ll never give up. I’ll never be quiet. I promise.
  8. At an early age I learned that people make mistakes, and you have to decide if their mistakes are bigger than your love for them.
  9. My nana likes to say that spring brings love. Spring in Garden Heights doesn’t always bring love, but it promises babies in the winter.
  10. “What is Tumblr anyway? Is it like Facebook?”
    “No, and you’re forbidden to get one. No parents allowed. You guys already took over Facebook.”
  11. It’s also about Oscar.
    Trayvon.
    Rekia.
    Michael.
    Eric.
    Tamir.
    John.
    Ezell.
    Sandra.
    Freddie.
    Alton.
    Philando.
    It’s even about that little boy in 1955 who nobody recognized at first—Emmett.

If you’re still not sold on Angie Thomas’s magic:

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What are your favorite The Hate U Give quotes? Oh, and if you’re here because you loved the book as much as we did, we gotcha. Here’s a list of brilliant books if you’re looking for read-alikes!

By , September 
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After ‘Forty Years Of Pointed Ears,’ ‘ElfQuest’ Ends Its Legendary Run

Cutter Kinseeker, chief of the Wolfriders, and his lifemate Leetah.
Wendy Pini

ElfQuest is something unique in the world of comics: It’s one of the longest-running fantasy series ever — and it’s been the passion project of just two people for its whole life.

There there were few comics shops, fewer conventions, and not a lot of women were making comics when creators Wendy and Richard Pini began their epic quest in 1978. But now that quest is over, and they’re on a farewell tour called Forty Years of Pointed Ears.

Elfquest 1

Elfquest 1The Final Quest
by Wendy Pini and Richard Pini
Paperback, 1 volume

ElfQuest is an old-fashioned comic. It isn’t dark, it isn’t gritty. It is what says on the cover: A four-decade saga about elves. Elves with big eyes, bigger hair, and really great abs. On a quest.

“The quest is to find out who this race of beings are,” says artist and co-creator Wendy Pini,”where they came from, and how they can best fit into this world that they’re on, that is not their true home.”

Cutter Kinseeker, chief of the Wolfriders, is the central character — and it’s his quest for home and community, his hero’s journey, that drives the story.

It’s easy to snark about the hair, the abs, and how incredibly earnest Cutter and his kin can be. But the comic is utterly addictive — start flipping those vintage black and white pages and you won’t stop. And a lot of that is down to Pini’s art, influenced by her love of Marvel Comics legend Jack Kirby and Japanese artists like Osamu Tezuka.

“Tezuka … he is considered the Walt Disney of Japan,” she says. “He created Astro Boy, Kimba the White Lion … and from Tezuka I learned the line of beauty. It’s a curving, sweeping kind of line that you see throughout Asian art that is so aesthetically, spiritually soothing and beautiful. And to take this soothing artwork and then apply it to action scenes where the characters are just literally going through hell creates such an amazing tension.”

Pini was already a working fantasy illustrator when she started drawing ElfQuest. It was 1978, and the time was right: Star Wars was huge, Lord of the Rings was on everyone’s shelves, so a comic about elves seeking a home on a planet not their own seemed like a sure bet. But there was just one problem: How do you get your comic into people’s hands when there are hardly any comics stores?

The very first issue of ElfQuest, from 1978.
Wendy Pini/IPS

Greg Bennett is the co-owner of Big Planet Comics in Bethesda, Md. — and an ElfQuest fan — and he says that when the Pinis first started making the comic, modern distribution systems just didn’t exist. “That’s daring as heck, because there was no way to get that stuff out there then other than to go to conventions, sell it yourself, go store to store to store and hand sell it.

The hand-selling worked; ElfQuest took off. In its 80s heyday, the Pinis say it was one of the first comics to make it into mainstream bookstores. These days, ElfQuest fans can be a little harder to find — it’s mostly a word of mouth kind of thing. But luckily for me, we have one here at NPR: Morning Edition supervising editor Melisa Goh.

“Everyone has a story, a movie, a book, something that was very influential in their lives at a young age, and ElfQuest was mine,” Goh says. “There is a community aspect to ElfQuest that I liked a lot. The idea that you were looking for your own kind, so that you can take community and shelter and solace in each other.”

Goh has loved ElfQuest since she was 11. She loved it so much, in fact, that she invented her own character.

“Her name was Triller. She wore blue. She was a musician, which was a little bit risque in the elf world that I had in my mind, because if you’re an ElfQuest elf you know that — ‘in the trees, as you please, on the ground, not a sound,’ so my character was a bit of a rebel because she liked to play music.”

It was actually kind of hard for me to pry that information loose, because Goh says she’s still traumatized about being teased for reading ElfQuest as a kid.

Comic shop owner Greg Bennett says that did happen — ElfQuest was always a little outside the mainstream, and its fans were mostly women at a time that women weren’t reading a lot of comics — so he sometimes had to deal with trash-talking customers. “And as a comic shop owner any time I heard somebody doing that I would always, first thing I would say is, well, did you ever read ElfQuest? And they would always say, well, no — I’m like OK, well, after you go read it, go read those first 20 black and white magazines, then come back and tell me ElfQuest’s no good — and any one of them actually took me up on it said oh wait, you’re right. This is really good.”

The last storyline — appropriately called “The Final Quest,” wrapped up earlier this year, 40 years to the day after the publication of the first issue. The Pinis aren’t abandoning the elves completely — they’re going to allow other creators to tell stories in their world. But they’re pretty close-mouthed about what’s coming next.

“We know what you want to know. So we’re focusing on that,” Wendy says.

“There are two strong threads, and the fans just want those threads spun out,” Richard adds. “I know, but we’re not going to cater to them,” Wendy chimes in. “We don’t know — just because we know what the fans want, doesn’t mean we’re going to take the story that way.”

If you want to join the quest, the early issues are available for free online.

By , September 26, 2018, first appearing on Books : NPR

The Government Bridge – Have you ever wondered…?

Me too!

If you want to learn more about this incredible structure join us for this presentation.

Gov Bridge

THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE SHORTLIST IS HERE!

The shortlist for the 2018 Man Booker Prize was announced today. Each shortlisted author will receive £2,500 and a specially-bound edition of their book. On Tuesday, October 16th the winning book will be announced and the winning author will receive £50,000.

Here’s the list!

Washington Black by Esi Edugyan book coverMilkman by Anna Burns (UK)
Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (Canada)
Everything Under by Daisy Johnson (UK)
The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner (USA)
The Overstory by Richard Powers (USA)
The Long Take by Robin Robertson (UK)

The judges for this year’s prize are Kwame Anthony Appiah, Val McDermid, Leo Robson, Jacqueline Rose, and Leanne Shapton. The shortlist was winnowed down from the longlist of 13 books announced on July 23rd.

The Long Take Robin Robertson coverSome notes on the list: It’s a UK-heavy list, with three of the books from the UK, two from the U.S. and one from Canada, with no other countries represented. It includes four women and two men, and one writer of color. The list contains more genre experimentation than ever before with its inclusion of The Long Take, a novel in verse. Notable books that did not make it from the longlist to the shortlist include Michael Ondaatje’s Warlight and Sally Rooney’s Normal People.

If you want to get a literal read on the nominees yourself, The Mars Room and The Overstory have already been out in the US, and Washington Black joined them just this week. Everything Under is out next month from Graywolf. Milkman and The Long Take are out in 2019, from Graywolf and Knopf, respectively. Of course, you can always pay more for an export edition if you just can’t wait to get your hands on a US edition.

Stay tuned for the announcement of the 2018 Man Booker Prize winner on October 16th!

By , September 

Did you enjoy Little Fires Everywhere?

Little Fires Everywhere Shelf End Ditto NU

Want more Dittos and book suggestions? You can find our Recommendations page here.

By the Numbers: Banned Books Week

More stats to celebrate the most frequently banned and challenged books

The Hate U Give

This year’s Banned Books Week is September 23–29.

416
Number of books banned or challenged in 2017, according to the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF).

100,000
Number of copies that Angie Thomas’s young adult novel, The Hate U Give, printed in its first month. The Coretta Scott King Book Awards honoree, about a teenager who witnesses a police shooting, was challenged in July by a South Carolina Fraternal Order of Police chapter for “indoctrination of distrust of police.”

80%
Percentage of 2017’s most commonly challenged books that tell the stories of people from marginalized groups.

1966
To Kill a MockingbirdYear of one of the earliest challenges to Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. The school board in Hanover County, Virginia, said it would remove the book from school libraries, citing the novel as “immoral.” The board walked back its decision after residents—and Lee herself—wrote to the local paper to defend the book.

13
Number of cassette tapes that teen protagonist Hannah Baker leaves behind to explain her suicide in the number-one banned book of 2017, 13 Reasons Why. The 2007 title has made the OIF list before but has become the subject of increased public scrutiny after the 2017 release of a Netflix series based on the novel.

56%
Percent of challenges that take place in public libraries. Twenty-five percent take place in school libraries, curricula, and classrooms.

13
Number of languages that Alex Gino’s George has been translated into since its publication in 2015. This Lambda Literary Award–winning children’s book has been challenged and banned because its protagonist is a transgender kid.

101
Number of the conference room at the BBC Radio studios where George Orwell worked to broadcast British propaganda to India between 1941 and 1943. The “re-education room” in his classic novel 1984, where dissenters were tortured with their worst fears, was based on the BBC room.

82–97%
Percentage of book challenges that OIF estimates go unreported.

September 25, 2018, first appearing in American Libraries Magazine