Books to Film: Spring(?) Edition

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba

6419887The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind.jpgMovie: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
When it comes out: March 1
What the book is about: William Kamkwamba was born in Malawi, a country where magic ruled and modern science was mystery. It was also a land withered by drought and hunger, and a place where hope and opportunity were hard to find. But William had read about windmills in a book called Using Energy, and he dreamed of building one that would bring electricity and water to his village and change his life and the lives of those around him. His neighbors may have mocked him and called him misala—crazy—but William was determined to show them what a little grit and ingenuity could do.

 

Transit by Anna Seghers

15823471Transit (2018 film).pngMovie: Transit
When it comes out: March 1
What the book is about: Having escaped from a Nazi concentration camp in Germany in 1937, and later a camp in Rouen, the nameless twenty-seven-year-old German narrator of Seghers’s multilayered masterpiece ends up in the dusty seaport of Marseille. Along the way he is asked to deliver a letter to a man named Weidel in Paris and discovers Weidel has committed suicide, leaving behind a suitcase containing letters and the manuscript of a novel.

 

Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincot


39939417Five Feet Apart (2019 poster).pngMovie:
Five Feet Apart
When it comes out: March 15
What the book is about: Stella Grant likes to be in control—even though her totally out of control lungs have sent her in and out of the hospital most of her life. At this point, what Stella needs to control most is keeping herself away from anyone or anything that might pass along an infection and jeopardize the possibility of a lung transplant. Six feet apart. No exceptions. The only thing Will Newman wants to be in control of is getting out of this hospital. He couldn’t care less about his treatments, or a fancy new clinical drug trial. Soon, he’ll turn eighteen and then he’ll be able to unplug all these machines and actually go see the world, not just its hospitals. Will’s exactly what Stella needs to stay away from. If he so much as breathes on Stella she could lose her spot on the transplant list. Either one of them could die. The only way to stay alive is to stay apart. But suddenly six feet doesn’t feel like safety. It feels like punishment.

 

The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook

15823419The Aftermath (2019 film) poster.jpg

Movie: The Aftermath
When it comes out: March 15
What the book is about: Hamburg, 1946. Thousands remain displaced in what is now the British Occupied Zone. Charged with overseeing the rebuilding of this devastated city and the de-Nazification of its defeated people, Colonel Lewis Morgan is requisitioned a fine house on the banks of the Elbe, where he will be joined by his grieving wife, Rachael, and only remaining son, Edmund. But rather than force its owners, a German widower and his traumatized daughter, to leave their home, Lewis insists that the two families live together.

 

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

13526165Where'd You Go Bernadette (film poster).pngMovie: Where’d You Go, Bernadette
When it comes out:
March 22
What the book is about:
Bernadette Fox has vanished. When her daughter Bee claims a family trip to Antarctica as a reward for perfect grades, Bernadette, a fiercely intelligent shut-in, throws herself into preparations for the trip. But worn down by years of trying to live the Seattle life she never wanted, Ms. Fox is on the brink of a meltdown. And after a school fundraiser goes disastrously awry at her hands, she disappears, leaving her family to pick up the pieces–which is exactly what Bee does, weaving together an elaborate web of emails, invoices, and school memos that reveals a secret past Bernadette has been hiding for decades.

 

The Dirt by Mötley Crüe & Neil Strauss

The Dirt.jpgThe Dirt movie posterMovie: The Dirt
When it comes out:
March 22
What the book is about:
Whiskey and porn stars, hot reds and car crashes, black leather and high heels, overdoses and death. This is the life of Mötley Crüe, the heaviest drinking, hardest fighting, most oversexed and arrogant band in the world. Their unbelievable exploits are the stuff of rock ‘n’ roll legend. They nailed the hottest chicks, started the bloodiest fights, partied with the biggest drug dealers, and got to know the inside of every jail cell from California to Japan. They have dedicated an entire career to living life to its extreme, from the greatest fantasies to the darkest tragedies. Tommy married two international sex symbols; Vince killed a man and lost a daughter to cancer; Nikki overdosed, rose from the dead, and then OD’d again the next day; and Mick shot a woman and tried to hang his own brother. But that’s just the beginning.

 

The Visible Filth by Nathan Ballingrud

24791985Image result for wounds 2019 filmMovie: Wounds
When it comes out:
March 29
What the book is about:
When Will discovers a cell phone after a violent brawl his life descends into a nightmare. Affable, charismatic and a little shallow, he’s been skating across the surface of life in a state of carefully maintained contentment. He decides to keep the cell phone just until the owner returns and everything changes. Then the messages begin. Will’s discovered something unspeakable and it’s crawling slowly into the light.

 

Unplanned by Abby Johnson

9640038Unplanned movie posterMovie: Unplanned
When it comes out:
March 29
What the book is about:
Abby Johnson quit her job in October 2009. That simple act became a national news story because Abby was the director of a Planned Parenthood clinic in Texas who, after participating in her first actual abortion procedure, walked across the road to join the Coalition for Life. “Unplanned” is a heart-stopping personal drama of life-and-death encounters, a courtroom battle, and spiritual transformation that speaks hope and compassion into the political controversy that surrounds this issue.

 

 

Valentine’s Day Ditto, Just for You!

And all the other people who read this blog post…

If Not For You Shelf End Ditto NU

Learn Your Library Resources (and Services) – Voter Registration

Image result for voter registration

That’s right. The Moline Public Library provides voter registration during most hours of operation. Since our voter registrars are sometimes busy with other library duties it isn’t a bad idea to call ahead at 524-2450 to inquire whether a registrar will be available.

What Do You Need to Register?
You may register to vote at the Moline Public Library under the following guidelines:

  1. You must live in Rock Island County
  2. You must be able to show 2 (two) forms of identification, 1 (one) indicating your current address
  3. You must be a resident at your current address at least 28 days before any election

Not sure if you’re registered?  You can find out by performing a Registration Lookup through the Illinois State Board of Elections web site.

When You Can Register?
Voter registration closes 28 days before an election and opens 3 days after an election.

And now, new residents/citizens/legal adults and the friends and family members of said individuals, you know where to go (or where to send them) if you (they) would like to register to vote in the next round of elections!

On a related note, the library is also a frequent location for early voting, so once you’re registered be on the lookout for an opportunity to beat the lines on election day by coming to the library to vote early!

 

 

Best Sellers Update: February ’19

New York Times Combined Print & E-Book Fiction Best Sellers List

  1. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens

36809135For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

  1. CRUCIBLE by James Rollins (NEW)
  2. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  3. PLAYING FOR KEEPS by Jill Shalvis (NEW)
  4. AN ANONYMOUS GIRL by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen
  5. THE RECKONING by John Grisham
  6. THE GOLDEN TRESSES OF THE DEAD by Alan Bradley (NEW)
  7. THE RULE OF LAW by John Lescroart (NEW)
  8. EYE OF THE NEEDLE by Ken Follett (NEW)
  9. WE SHOULDN’T by Vi Keeland (NEW)
  10. LIAR LIAR by James Patterson and Candice Fox
  11. TURNING POINT by Danielle Steel
  12. ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman
  13. AN AMERICAN MARRIAGE by Tayari Jones
  14. A DISCOVERY OF WITCHES by Deborah Harkness

In honor of the Miniature Book Exhibit currently on display at the Moline Library…

Why we are fascinated by miniature books?

From a tiny copy of the Divine Comedy and a once-illegal birth control guide to a Bible the size of a stamp, these strange artifacts are masterpieces writ small.

 

A miniature book containing The Lord’s Prayer is displayed at London Christie’s in 2006, that measures five by five millimetres. Photograph: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

It is known as the “fly’s eye Dante”: an 1878 edition of the Divine Comedy which is so small – just 11/4 by 13/4 inches – that it is said to have taken 11 years to print, and to have damaged the eyes of both its compositor and corrector. Bound in red leather embossed with gold, the world’s smallest edition of Dante’s classic poem, which was printed by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, is one of almost 50 officially designated miniature books housed in the London Library. Nomenclature is important here: according to the US-based Miniature Book Society, a miniature book “is no more than three inches in height, width, or thickness”, and while the London Library has some 350-odd “small” books, of less than five inches, it has only 47 true miniatures. The library decided they were being overshadowed by their larger cousins, so now they are gathered together in a glass-fronted cabinet.

Get the whole article at the Guardian.