Books to Film: May Edition

Tell It to the Bees by Fiona Shaw

6767519Tell It to the Bees (film poster 2019).jpgMovie: Tell It to the Bees
When it comes out: May 3
What the book is about: Lydia Weekes is distraught at the break-up of her marriage. When her young son, Charlie, makes friends with the local doctor, Jean Markham, her life is turned upside down. Charlie tells his secrets to no one but the bees, but even he can’t keep his mother’s friendship to himself. The locals don’t like things done differently. As Lydia and the doctor become closer, the rumors start to fly and threaten to shatter Charlie’s world.

The Surgeon of Crowthorne by Simon Winchester

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When it comes out: May 10
What the book is about: An extraordinary tale of madness, genius, and the incredible obsessions of two remarkable men that led to the making of the Oxford English Dictionary — and literary history. The compilation of the OED, begun in 1857, was one of the most ambitious projects ever undertaken. As definitions were collected, the overseeing committee, led by Professor James Murray, discovered that one man, Dr. W. C. Minor, had submitted more than ten thousand. When the committee insisted on honoring him, a shocking truth came to light: Dr. Minor, an American Civil War veteran, was also an inmate at an asylum for the criminally insane.

The Family: The Story of Charles Manson’s Dune Buggy Attack Battalion by Ed Sanders & The Long Prison Journey of Leslie Van Houten by Karlene Faith

5073151100168Charlie Says (2018 film) poster.jpgMovie: Charlie Says
When it comes out: May 10
What the book is about: The Family: The first full-length, chronological account of the Manson clan tracks the case through two decades of turmoil and include revealing information on the highly publicized murder trial of 1970 and 1971, Squeaky Fromme’s attempt to shoot President Gerald Ford, and Manson’s continued leadership of the Satanic underground from behind bars.

The Long Prison Journey of Leslie Van Houten: At The Age Of Twenty-One, Leslie Van Houten was sentenced to death, along with Charles Manson and his other disciples, for the infamous murder rampage spanning two nights in August 1969. Leslie, who was present at the Rosemary and Leno LaBianca stabbings, serenely accepted her sentence, wishing only that she had better served Manson in carrying out his apocalyptic vision of Helter Skelter. When the United States temporarily suspended its death penalty, her sentence for murder conspiracy was converted to life in prison. Today, at the age of 51, after three trials and with no parole in sight, Leslie has become a remarkable survivor of a living nightmare.

A Dog’s Journey by W. Bruce Cameron

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Movie: A Dog’s Journey
When it comes out: May 17
What the book is about: The direct sequel to the New York Times and USA Today bestselling A Dog’s Purpose.

Buddy is a good dog. After searching for his purpose through several eventful lives, Buddy is sure that he has found and fulfilled it. Yet as he watches curious baby Clarity get into dangerous mischief, he is certain that this little girl is very much in need of a dog of her own.

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

28763485The Sun Is Also a Star film poster.pngMovie: The Sun Is Also a Star
When it comes out:
May 17
What the book is about:
Natasha is a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. Definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when her family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica.

Daniel has always been the good son, the good student, living up to his parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when he sees her, he forgets about all that. Something about Natasha makes him think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store.

Aniara by Harry Martinson

1138948Aniara movie posterMovie: Aniara
When it comes out:
May 17
What the book is about:
Harry Martinson’s Epic Science Fiction Poem, is at once a warning of despair in the time of the nuclear weapons and the looming threat of ecological disaster and perhaps the most complete expression of Martinson’s lifelong project to illustrate man’s attempts to truly see himself and his role in creation.

Trial by Fire” (The New Yorker) by David Grann

Trial by Fire.jpgMovie: Trial by Fire
When it comes out:
May 17
What the book is about:
When Elizabeth Gilbert approached the prison guard, on a spring day in 1999, and said Cameron Todd Willingham’s name, she was uncertain about what she was doing. A forty-seven-year-old French teacher and playwright from Houston, Gilbert was divorced with two children. She had never visited a prison before. Several weeks earlier, a friend, who worked at an organization that opposed the death penalty, had encouraged her to volunteer as a pen pal for an inmate on death row, and Gilbert had offered her name and address. Not long after, a short letter, written with unsteady penmanship, arrived from Willingham, convicted of setting the fire that killed his three young children. “If you wish to write back, I would be honored to correspond with you,” he said. He also asked if she might visit him. Perhaps out of a writer’s curiosity, or perhaps because she didn’t feel quite herself (she had just been upset by news that her ex-husband was dying of cancer), she agreed. Now she was standing in front of the decrepit penitentiary in Huntsville, Texas—a place that inmates referred to as “the death pit.” Gilbert came to believe that the polite unassuming man Willingham was innocent and would soon set out on a long, frustrating journey to find the truth.

Need to catch up on your Graphic Novel reading? Or start?

Graphic Novels (and the one comics that they come from) are more popular than ever.

Sequential art (to use a term coined by Will Eisner) as a method of story telling has been around for roughly the entire history of mankind but up until the last century or so it had fallen out of fashion. Even then it was considered kids stuff. Only in the last couple of decades has it really come to be recognized as a legitimate form of literature and art.

The “Graphic Novel” has gone mainstream. They’re used in classrooms, adapted into popular TV shows and movies and enjoyed by people of all ages.

Image result for umbrella academyIf you are uncertain if Graphic Novels are for you pick a movie or TV show that’s been based on a graphic novel or comic that you like (The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, Umbrella Academy, Preacher, The Walking Dead, Deadly Class, the MCU, the DCEU, and so on, and so on) and start there. Or you could go for a graphic adaptation of classic literature or popular novels. Or nonfiction graphic novels about everything from physics to life abroad to economics. Or something entirely different. If you look around enough you’re bound to find something to interest you.

But where are you supposed to do this looking?

We’re glad you asked. The Moline Public Library has a Graphic Novel section in each of its three main areas, children’s, young adult and adult. In addition to that we have access to all the graphic novels in the PrairieCat system if you don’t mind waiting a week or so for them to be sent in. Then there is hoopla!, one of our e-material collections, which has an impressive amount of comics and graphic novels on offer for you to checkout, download and read on your digital device. 

Graphic Novels: Try them, you’ll like them.

HAPPY EARTH DAY EVERYONE!

Mother, space ship, cradle or where you keep all your stuff, however you view the Earth it is something worth celebrating and protecting.

Earth

Here are 10 literary quotes about the Earth to contemplate today:

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” ― Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space

“The planet was being destroyed by manufacturing processes, and what was being manufactured was lousy, by and large.” ― Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions

“We called her Mother Earth. Because she gave birth to us, and then we sucked her dry.” ― Jon Stewart, Earth (The Book): A Visitor’s Guide to the Human Race

“What you take from the earth, you must give back. That’s nature’s way.” ― Chris d’Lacey, The Fire Within

“Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.” ― Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.” ― Rachel Carson, The Sense of Wonder

“What makes earth feel like hell is our expectation that it should feel like heaven.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Damned

“What is the use of a house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?” ― Henry David Thoreau, Familiar Letters

“And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair” ― Khalil Gibran, The Prophet

“How can we be so arrogant? The planet is, was, and always will be stronger than us. We can’t destroy it; if we overstep the mark, the planet will simply erase us from its surface and carry on existing. Why don’t they start talking about not letting the planet destroy us?” ― Paulo Coelho, The Winner Stands Alone

 

“The Public” is out in select theaters now!

Unfortunately the closest “select theaters” are in the Chicago suburbs, but still, we’re excited about it and you should be too. Addressing the issues of homelessness and mental health, public libraries, Emilio Estevez! How could we not be interested?

If you can’t make it to a theater showing it just keep it in mind for when it gets a wider release or, more likely, is out on DVD. In the meantime, check it out and, if you think it looks promising, pass it along.

Christian Slater, Alec Baldwin, Emilio Estevez, Gabrielle Union, Jacob Vargas, Michael Kenneth Williams, and Jeffrey Wright in The Public (2018)

A particularly brutal Arctic blast (sounds familiar) has hit downtown Cincinnati, including the public library, where most of the film takes place. Library officials and some homeless patrons are at odds over how to handle the dangerous weather event. When the patrons turn the building into a shelter for the night by staging an “Occupy” sit in, what begins as an act of civil disobedience escalates to a stand-off with police with the rush-to-judgment media constantly speculating about what’s really happening (sounds familiar too). This story tackles some of our society’s most challenging issues, homelessness and mental illness, and is set in one of the last bastions of democracy-in-action: the public library.

So, not topical or relevant at all then.

Just kidding. Obviously.

Watch the trailer!

Murder on the Orient Express

Do you enjoy intelligent murder mysteries, trains, movies made from books about murder on trains, and/or anything by Agatha Christie? If so, here are some other things you might be interested in.

Murder on the Orient Express Shelf End Ditto NU

Did you know?

We are everywhere!

By “We” I mean public libraries, of course.

Image result for public libraries Image result for public libraries Image result for public libraries

According to the American Library Association there are 16,568 public libraries (including branch locations) in the United States!

That’s more libraries than there are Starbucks! Than there are McDonald’s! More than all the KFCs, Taco Bells and Walmarts put together! 

According to the Institute of Museum and Library Services, those 16,568 libraries serve over 297 million people, over 96% of the population! There are 3 libraries and 5.8 library outlets (branches, bookmobiles, etc.) for every 100,000 people.

It turns out we are a big part of life for a huge number of Americans. We’re just kind of quiet about it. Self-promotion is difficult when you have been quietly doing your job of providing free access to books, information, technology, services and educational, cultural and entertainment programming for the last couple of hundred years. We are working on it, but it is slow going.

The good news is that you can help. If you are one of those 297 million that we serve, and odds are good that your are, just keep us in mind. Remember us the next time you’re in line at Starbucks, and maybe make a note to let somebody know about how great the local library is.

It doesn’t matter where your are, there should be one nearby.

Questions about the upcoming 2020 census?

 

Image result for censusStop by our lobby to meet Recruiting Assistant Sunday Saunders.  She will be available to answer questions about the upcoming 2020 Census and discuss the many job openings available to Rock Island County residents.