Learn about Essential Oils at the library

Learn how to fight stress and anxiety just in time for the holidays ;-).

Essential Oils

Advertisements

Picture books, not just for kids!

Picture Book Month

Okay, so they are mostly for kids. Chances are if you’ve read a picture book lately you are either a young kid or have a young kid (or you’re a teacher or children’s librarian), and that is fine, more than fine in fact – that’s awesome – but I’m here to tell you non-kids/parents/teachers/librarians that you can enjoy picture books too.

A lot of them are funny, creative, beautiful, inspiring and educational no matter what age you are. And November is the month to recognize that!

Here are some good ones, chosen at random from the thousands of great picture books out there, if you’re curious:

<i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0064430227/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Harold and the Purple Crayon</a></i> (<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0064430227/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Crockett Johnson. A creative boy crafts entire worlds of his own devising, using only his trusty crayon. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0451470516/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Madeline (series)</a></i> (<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0451470516/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Ludwig Bemelmans. A spunky French girl navigates boarding school and the removal of her appendix with confidence and poise. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060580860/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Frog and Toad (series)</a></i> (<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060580860/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Arnold Lobel. Two inseparable best friends keep each other company during all their adventures. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/078681988X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/078681988X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Mo Williams. One stubborn pigeon refuses to give up on his bird-brained dream of driving a vehicle.
<i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0394823370/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Lorax</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0394823370/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Dr. Seuss. Seuss takes on serious subject matter without compromising his playful style in this environmentalist fable. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0140501738/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Corduroy</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0140501738/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Don Freeman. In the middle of the night, a toy bear comes to life and hops off the shelf to replace his missing button. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0763655988/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">I Want My Hat Back</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0763655988/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Jon Klassen. The witty account of a bear seeking out his lost hat; the illustrations are studded with subtle clues. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/039480001X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Cat in the Hat</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/039480001X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Dr. Seuss. A big cat surprises Dick and Sally, transforming their dreary day at home into a wild adventure. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811879542/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Press Here</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811879542/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Herve Tullet. An innovative, interactive work that gets kids to play with the physical form of the book.
<i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0399255370/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Day the Crayons Quit</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0399255370/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Drew Daywalt, illustrations by Oliver Jeffers. All the crayons in Duncan's box go on strike, citing all kinds of hilarious grievances. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/039527804X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Garden of Abdul Gasazi</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/039527804X/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Chris Van Allsburg. An elegant, eerie story about an enchanted garden where it is not easy to separate what's real from what isn't. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1423133080/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Elephant and Piggie (series)</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1423133080/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Mo Willems. Two best friends learn all kind of lessons in this series of low-stakes moral dilemmas. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0763660531/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Journey</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0763660531/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Aaron Becker. A girl armed with a magic crayon draws to escape her boring, colorless world. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0394800168/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Green Eggs and Ham</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0394800168/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Dr. Seuss. Everyone knows this poem singing the prasies of an unlikely meal, but it never gets old.
<i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1596434023/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">A Sick Day for Amos McGee</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1596434023/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Philip C. Stead, illustrations by Erin E. Stead. An elderly man makes daily visits to his animal pals at the zoo, and they return the favor when he falls sick. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1442457023/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/1442457023/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By William Joyce, illustrations by Williamy Joyce and Joe Bluhm. This tale affirms that no matter the medium—printed page or electronic screen—we will always be gripped by stories. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060245867/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">If You Give a Mouse a Cookie</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0060245867/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Laura Joffe Numeroff, illustrations by Felicia Bond. This playful parable of a greedy mouse shows kids that every cause has an effect. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0698113829/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Lon Po Po</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0698113829/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Ed Young. In this dark variant of Little Red Riding Hood, young sisters deliver swift justice to the big bad wolf. <i><br><strong><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0698113829/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">The Berenstain Bears (series)</a></i>
(<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0698113829/?tag=timecom-20" target="_blank">Buy here</a>)</strong></br>By Stan &amp; Jan Berenstain. Each tale about this family of bears packs in a lesson about morality or health.

 Try a few. You might just be surprised by how much you enjoy them.

HOW TO READ A BOOK: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

There is, as it turns out, a correct way to dive into the pages of a volume. If you’ve ever wondered how to read a book, you’ll want to read this simple guide. Don’t get lost in the ether.

How to Read a Book

STEP ONE: PICK A BOOK.
This is deceptively difficult. As it turns out, there are millions of books in the world, and, for the time being, us humans must assume we are operating on a limited amount of time in which to read a finite amount of books.

STEP TWO: HAVE A BRIEF EXISTENTIAL CRISIS.
With a fixed amount of time to live, you’ll suddenly feel the crushing and urgent sense of time running out. Then, you’ll remember one day—or will it be night?—the sun will swallow the Earth whole in an amount of time too small to measure and none of this will matter anyway. Cheers.

STEP THREE: PICK A BOOK. (SERIOUSLY.)
Pick any damn book, because of Step Two.

STEP FOUR: OPEN THE BOOK.
Unless you’re ereading, you’ll need to lift the front cover to open the book. It’s much easier to read once you’ve opened the book (except for you, Superman; go on with your x-ray vision).

STEP FIVE: START READING.
Let your eyes follow the lilt of the sentences that begin your book. Decide the author’s style is too something—pretentious; wordy; slow; whatever doesn’t work for you, insert it here—and remember that life is short (sidestep the existential crisis this time). Put the book back. Go back to Step Three.

STEP THREE, REVISITED: PICK A BOOK. (NO, SERIOUSLY THIS TIME. THIS IS RIDICULOUS.)
Pick any damn book, because of Step Two.

STEP FOUR, REVISITED: OPEN THE BOOK.
Nice work, you’re really getting the hang of this.

STEP FIVE, REVISITED: START READING.
Let your eyes follow—oh, you’ve got it.

STEP SIX: GET COMFORTABLE.
Congratulations on selecting a book to read for real. Find a comfy spot and get settled. Maybe grab a blanket. Books warm your heart, but not your legs.

STEP SEVEN: DECIDE YOU NEED A SNACK.
It’s not your fault the author started of with a description of a feast. Leave your book pages-down on your spot (even though you’re only on page one; you might forget between here and the kitchen) and prepare something delicious for yourself. Sometimes “prepare” just means “take it out of a box.” No shame.

STEP EIGHT: RETURN TO YOUR BOOK, RESETTLE.
Get comfy. Again. Take a bite of your delicious whatever. Realize it’s too dry to go on eating without something to drink. Sigh, put the book down again, this time with a bookmark because too much time splayed open could damage it (never mind that doing it at all could damage it; we aren’t the book police here), and return to the kitchen for a drink.

STEP NINE: RETURN TO YOUR BOOK, RESETTLE. AGAIN.
Set yourself up for the story of a lifetime.

STEP TEN: READ.
Open your book as in Step Four, let your eyes follow the lilt of sentences as in Step Five. Go on in this state for as long as you can. Shift your body as needed. Nibble now and then.

STEP ELEVEN: FORGET YOUR DRINK.
Tale as old as time, your hot beverage has gone cold, your cold beverage has gone warm, and your room-temperature beverage has a bug in it or something. Such is the cost of a good book. Handle your drink in whatever way is appropriate (reheat; add ice cubes; dump it down the sink and refill). Resume reading.

STEP TWELVE: READ PAST YOUR BEDTIME.
Look up, long after you’ve turned the light on, to realize the sky has gone totally dark and your clock is chiming double-digits. Rub your eyes. Flip through the pages and note that you only have a few more to go before the next chapter—probably a better stopping point than mid-sentence.

STEP THIRTEEN: READ PAST YOUR REAL BEDTIME.
Discover the chapter ends on a cliff-hanger. Read on.

STEP FOURTEEN: NEVER SLEEP AGAIN.
Well, there are only another hundred pages. No sense in quitting now.

STEP FIFTEEN: SAY GOODBYE TO THE FRIENDS YOU’VE MADE.
The book ends in one way or another and you have to say farewell to the characters and places therein. It’s a lonely farewell, but a necessary one.

STEP SIXTEEN: SLEEP.
Sleep is for the weak, so they say, but your body doesn’t give a damn. Crawl into bed. Worry, vaguely, that you’ve wasted a few hours of your life on a book and the sun is coming for you in more ways than one.

STEP SEVENTEEN: LIVE.
Realize that each book you read is another life lived, and your singular life is all the richer for it. Wait for the sun.

By , October 

Let’s all (pretend to) go to Paris!

Do you ever find yourself sitting around on a slow Saturday afternoon wondering what it would have been like to visit Paris a century ago? 

Of course you do. Who hasn’t? And normally it’s so hard to find a way to satisfy your curiosity, but not Saturday, October 13 at the Moline Public Library! 

Saturday Afternoon in Paris