There’s Still Time!…

To read the book before the movie comes out.

Zookeepers WifeThe Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman

When it comes out: March 31 (better hurry on this one)

What it’s about: True story of how zookeepers in Warsaw, Poland helped to save their animal charges as well as hundreds of people during the Nazi occupation of their country in the early days of WWII.

 

WonderWonder by R.J. Palacio

When it comes out: April 7

What it’s about: The story focuses on Auggie, a young boy born with a facial deformity, who is about to start attending school for the first time. The story is as much about how Auggie and others view him as it is about the struggle to fit in and to accept.

 

Lost City of ZThe Lost City of Z by David Grann

When it comes out: April 14

What it’s about: Another non-fiction book about historical events, this is the author’s account of his search for the lost expedition of the famous British explorer Percy Fawcett that disappeared in the Amazon in 1925 searching for the eponymous fabled city. The narrative jumps back and forth between the authors own journey into the jungle and Fawcett’s ill-fated expedition.

Genre Friday Returns! with Court Intrigue Fantasy

Whether it is set on Earth (past, present or future), in a parallel world or universe, or a mystic realm where the familiar laws of nature do not apply, Fantasy allows imagination to run wild. True to this idea, Fantasy’s many subgenres can vary from one another a great deal, encompassing just about anything one could imagine, which helps to explain the genre’s ever-growing breadth and depth.

The Court Intrigue subgenre of Fantasy generally focuses on and around royalty and the ruling elite. Settings can be anything from a well known historical backdrop (but with magic or something) to some unrecognizable alternate world but we are almost always going to be dealing with the upper crust of society and their despicable plotting and scheming. The plots of these stories are often complex and heavily entangled with politics, power grabs, espionage, assassinations (successful and attempted), court scandal and everything else that you would expect from a political thriller, but normally set in feudal, medieval-esque surroundings with sorcerers and dragons about.

GOTCoverMIAExamples:

A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

3.141592653589793238462643383279 Day

Pi.pngIt’s Pi Day!

The day to celebrate pi, the mathematical constant that describes the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, is finally here.

Celebrate by doing complex math equations, having pi recitation competitions with your friends to see who can remember the famously unending number out to the most decimal places (the current world record is 70,030 places) or visiting the Pi Day website.

Or you can do what most people do and take advantage of the famous number’s homophonous relationship with a certain type of dessert and go out for a slice. And while you’re out, eating pie and thinking about pi, feel free to stop into the Moline Library and pick up that book on math (or desserts) that you have been meaning to read. It’s always a good day for pi(e) at the library.

Author Birthdays – Forward, March!

Gabriel Garcia Marquez (b. March 6, 1927, Aracataca, Colombia; d. April 17, 2014, Mexico City, Mexico)

Marquez“It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: Love in the Time of Cholera and One Hundred Years of Solitude

For more information on Gabriel Garcia Marquez, click here.

 

Bret Easton Ellis (b. March 7, 1964, Los Angeles, CA)

Ellis“I’d rather let the fiction speak for itself and I don’t want to write fiction that tells people how to feel, and I don’t want to be judgmental in the fiction.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: American Psycho

For more information on Bret Easton Ellis, click here.

 

Douglas Adams (b. March 11, 1952, Cambridge, UK; d. May 11, 2001, Montecito, CA)

Adams“Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

For more information on Douglas Adams, click here.

 

Jack Kerouac (b. March 12, 1922, Lowell, MA; d. October 21, 1969, St. Petersburg, FL)

Kerouac“Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: On the Road

For more information on Jack Kerouac, click here.

 

 

L. Ron Hubbard (b. March 13, 1911, Tilden, NE; d. January 24, 1986, Creston, CA)

Hubbard“I have seen life from the top down and the bottom up. I know how it looks both ways. And I know there is wisdom and that there is hope.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: Battlefield Earth

For more information on L. Ron Hubbard, click here.

 

Richard Condon (b. March 18, 1915, New York, NY; d. April 9, 1996, Dallas, TX)

Condon“I think the most important part of storytelling is tension. It’s the constant tension of suspense that in a sense mirrors life, because nobody knows what’s going to happen three hours from now.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: The Manchurian Candidate

For more information on Richard Condon, click here.

 

John Updike (b. March 18, 1932, Reading, PA; d. January 27, 2009, Danvers, MA)

Updike“Most of American life consists of driving somewhere and then returning home, wondering why the hell you went.” Find more quotes here.

What you should read: Rabbit, Run

For more information on John Updike, click here.