14 Favorite Book Sidekicks to Celebrate on Dr. Watson’s Birthday

Goodreads Blog: Posted by Hayley Igarashi on July 07, 2017

BudsToday is the birthday of one of literature’s most beloved and long-suffering sidekicks, Dr. John Watson. A war veteran as well as an accomplished writer and detective, Watson gives Sherlock Holmes much-needed backup and friendship, all while enduring less-than-complimentary observations about his character. “You have a grand gift for silence, Watson,” Sherlock says at one point. “It makes you quite invaluable as a companion.”

To celebrate the good doctor’s birthday, [goodreads.com] asked you on Facebook and Twitter to share your favorite book sidekicks. Check out some of the most popular answers below and add your own in the comments!

Sherlock1. Dr. John Watson
Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes books and stories

Sherlock’s friend, roommate, biographer, crime-solving partner and on-hand physician

 

Harry Potter2. Ron and Hermione
J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books

Harry’s fellow Gryffindors, friends, partners in managing mischief, frequent rescuers (especially Hermione) and family

Click here for the rest of the list…

A List of Books that Sold the Most Copies

If only there was a shorter way of writing that. Oh yeah…

NYT Best Sellers List

  1. CAMINO ISLAND by John Grisham

Camino IslandAfter a gang of thieves stage a daring heist from a secure vault deep below Princeton University’s Firestone Library, Mercer Mann, a young novelist with a severe case of writer’s block who has recently been laid off from her teaching position, is approached by a mysterious woman working for an even more mysterious company. The woman offers a generous amount of money in exchange for a job. All Mercer has to do is go undercover and infiltrate the circle of literary friends that surround Bruce Cable, a prominent rare book dealer that occasionally dabbles in the black market of stolen books and manuscripts, and learn what she can. But eventually Mercer learns far too much, and there’s trouble in paradise.

  1. THE IDENTICALS by Elin Hilderbrand (NEW THIS WEEK)
  2. TOM CLANCY: POINT OF CONTACT by Mike Maden (NEW THIS WEEK)
  3. COME SUNDOWN by Nora Roberts
  4. THE HANDMAID’S TALE by Margaret Atwood
  5. THE FIX by David Baldacci
  6. INTO THE WATER by Paula Hawkins
  7. THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10 by Ruth Ware
  8. MILK AND HONEY by Rupi Kaur
  9. DRAGON TEETH by Michael Crichton

Genre Friday – Pulp Fiction

Actually, it has surprisingly little to do with Quentin Tarantino.

Pulp

Pub. January 1952

Initially more a format than a genre, Pulp Fiction was a general term used to describe the stories published in pulp magazines – cheap magazines printed on rough, wood pulp paper (magazines printed on smooth, high-quality paper were called “glossies”). It was not a complimentary description.

Pulp fiction was synonymous with run-of-the-mill, low-quality literature that got by more on its cheap thrills and lurid details than on any merit.

It was, of course, wildly popular.

At least until WWII, when paper shortages and rising production costs spelled the end for many pulp publications.

Pulp_modern

Pub. June 2017

Today pulp fiction lives on mostly as an homage to those early 20th century writers and short stories. Pulp fiction, whether it be sci-fi, adventure, crime fiction, etc., had a certain sensationalist feel and many common themes and elements that developed over the decades of their popularity and some modern authors (especially hard-boiled crime authors) have taken those elements and brought them to their books and stories today. Or movies (there’s your Tarantino-tie-in).

 

 

 

 

Zinio Users, Switch to RB Digital App

Zinio to RBd

The Zinio for Libraries app is being replaced by the new RBdigital app.

For current Zinio users, and any other Moline Library patrons that are interested in eMagazines, there is a new app in town. The new RBdigital app is available to the public starting Tuesday, June 27.

Switching is easy. All you need to do is download the free RBdigital app from your app store of choice and then log in to the new app using the same log in information (email and password) that you used in the Zinio app. And that’s it!

For first time users, once you download the app, all you will need is your Moline Library card number, your email address and to create a password in order to create an account.

Once you’ve done this all of the magazines that you have checked out in Zinio (if you have any) will automatically show up in the new RBdigital app. You will have to re-download titles but other than that there isn’t anything else that you need to do. Plus, you can search for and check out new issues or magazines right in the app (as opposed to being rerouted to a browser window like in the old app).

For those of you reeling for the sudden change, don’t worry, you have plenty of time to adjust to the idea before you make the switch. The Zinio for Libraries app will still be up and running for a couple of months before it is phased out in favor of the new app. So, if you don’t like change (or just want to wait for the unfortunately inevitable bugs in the new app to be worked out) you can safely wait a little while.

As always, if you have any questions or problems with the app feel free to stop by the second floor reference desk and we will be happy to help.