Music, Fighting Spirit and Winning the Civil War

how an illinois music store helped win the civil war

Christian McWhirter, research historian at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, presents of fascinating program about the Chicago-based music publishing firm of Root & Cady.

During the American Civil War, the company rose quickly to become the most successful and influential in the nation, providing the Union with some of its most popular and meaningful patriotic anthems, such as “The Battle Cry of Freedom” and “Just Before the Battle, Mother” during the American Civil War (1861-1865).

Christian McWhirter is the author of Battle Hymns: The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2012).

The free, hour-long program is opened to all ages.

CONCERT AT THE LIBRARY!

String Quartet

The Marian Anderson String Quartet  (MASQ) creates new and diverse audiences for string quartet concerts.

In 1991, MASQ won the International Cleveland Quartet Competition, becoming the first African American ensemble in history to win this classical music competition. To highlight their achievement, MASQ  asked the renowned contralto, Marian Anderson, for permission to use her name as their own. Miss Anderson responded with heartfelt approval.

In 1993, the Marian Anderson String Quartet performed at Washington D.C.’s Kennedy Center as part of the 52nd presidential inaugural celebration.  MASQ has given performances at the Da Camera Society, the San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center.

For more about MASQ, visit http://www.marianandersonstringquartet.com/about-masq/

Marian Anderson String Quartet made possible with support from Chamber Music America through its Residency Endowment Fund.

Gaelic Song Concert at the Moline Library

Gaelic Songs

Dan Haughey professional singer and actor from the Quad Cities performs his “Gaelic Songs” acoustical show.

His solo guitar and song revue includes favorite crowd-pleasing tunes like “My Wild Irish Rose”, “Galway Bay”, and “When Irish Eyes Are Smilin’”.

Haughey has appeared as a guitarist-singer in Quad Cities coffee shops with talented mid-west Celtic players and at the Windmill Cultural Center in Fulton, Illinois.  He is currently is co-writing an Irish-American modern musical based on his Irish roots.

In honor of the Miniature Book Exhibit currently on display at the Moline Library…

Why we are fascinated by miniature books?

From a tiny copy of the Divine Comedy and a once-illegal birth control guide to a Bible the size of a stamp, these strange artifacts are masterpieces writ small.

 

A miniature book containing The Lord’s Prayer is displayed at London Christie’s in 2006, that measures five by five millimetres. Photograph: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

It is known as the “fly’s eye Dante”: an 1878 edition of the Divine Comedy which is so small – just 11/4 by 13/4 inches – that it is said to have taken 11 years to print, and to have damaged the eyes of both its compositor and corrector. Bound in red leather embossed with gold, the world’s smallest edition of Dante’s classic poem, which was printed by the Salmin Brothers in Padua, is one of almost 50 officially designated miniature books housed in the London Library. Nomenclature is important here: according to the US-based Miniature Book Society, a miniature book “is no more than three inches in height, width, or thickness”, and while the London Library has some 350-odd “small” books, of less than five inches, it has only 47 true miniatures. The library decided they were being overshadowed by their larger cousins, so now they are gathered together in a glass-fronted cabinet.

Get the whole article at the Guardian.