Thank you, millennials.

Not something that gets said very often, but according to the Pew Research Center public libraries might start saying it more.

PEW MillennialsMillennials are the most likely generation of Americans to use public libraries

A new analysis of Pew Research Center survey data from fall 2016 finds that 53% of Millennials (those ages 18 to 35 at the time) say they used a library or bookmobile in the previous 12 months. That compares with 45% of Gen Xers, 43% of Baby Boomers and 36% of those in the Silent Generation.

Relatively high library use by Millennials might be related to changes that many public libraries have undergone in the past 20 years. Previous Pew Research Center surveys have documented how extensively people use computers and internet connections at libraries, as well as how interested they are in extra services such as literacy programs for young children, meeting spaces for community groups, and technology “petting zoos” that provide opportunities to explore 3-D printers and other tech gadgetry.

You can find the full article here.

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Know anyone that needs computer help?

Computer ClassI’m assuming that most of our blog readers probably have the basics down, but if you don’t, or you know someone who doesn’t, don’t hesitate to register for one or both of our introductory classes today.

Are we there yet? It’s been July forever!

July, aka NATIONAL ANTI-BOREDOM MONTH, is more than half-way over!

Fun Fact: It’s also NATIONAL READ AN ALMANAC MONTH. How those go together, we couldn’t tell you.

So, how are your boredom levels? Feeling listless? Weary? Have you recently made a sound something like this, “Uuuuuuuuu,’mso bored.”?

Bored

You should come to the library.

As my mother-in-law used to say, “Smart people don’t get bored.” I always took this as more of a challenge than a statement of literal fact, but, either way, we can help you with that.

Find a book, a video game, a movie, an audio book, anything. If you can’t pick one yourself fill out a Library Concierge form and we will pick some for you based on what you like. If that doesn’t work, surf the Internet on the public computers or grab something from our language section and start brushing up on your foreign languages. Even if everything else fails and you decide you don’t want that book or movie, have seen everything worthwhile on the Internet and decide that you don’t need to know conversational Swahili after all, then at least you got out of the house for a bit.

 

A big day for the World Wide Web…

And, by extension, virtually everything else on the planet!

The WWW may have been invented at CERN by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989, but that wouldn’t have meant much to the rest of us, not until April of 1993.

Today is the day. Twenty-four years ago, on April 30, 1993, CERN put the World Wide Web in the public domain. They gave the world the Internet, or at least the seeds that would become the Internet that we know today! Just gave it away! It is hard to imagine what our world would be like without the World Wide Web – simpler maybe, but probably not better (after all, you wouldn’t be reading this blog for starters… and that’s just a sad thought).

So, the next time you are surfing the web, researching what breed of dog is best suited for your lifestyle, finding a recipe for zucchini enchiladas or checking your library’s catalog to see if that book you have been waiting for is available, take a moment to realize how different life would be without the web and be grateful that CERN decided to share with the rest of us. Maybe high-five a Swiss scientist if you have one handy. Hugs are probably okay too, but you might want to ask first.

WWW

Tim Berners-Lee at CERN in 1994. An early version of World Wide Web software is running on the screen behind him (Image: CERN)

Today is World Backup Day. Do you know where your data is?

Back Up Day

Today is the day that everyone everywhere is reminded and encouraged to create a backup copy of all that digital information that you can’t live without, from tax records to pictures of the grandkids. You can go to the official website for more information.

What does this have to do with Moline Library? Nothing. We just think that it’s a really good idea and we like to look out for folks. May your digital information last forever (but we’d back it up just in case).

CAPS LOCK DAY!

NO, I AM NOT YELLING! I AM CELEBRATING CAPS LOCK DAY. Well, sort of.

capslokkFor those of you unfamiliar with this holiday (which is forgivable since it has only been around since 2000), a little background:

According to daysoftheyear.com, Caps Lock Day started when Derek Arnold of Iowa (Yay for homegrown holidays!) decided that he had simply had enough of people using all caps when writing on the web – YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE. He created Caps Lock Day to bring attention to this very important issue. Seriously, there is no reason for it – it just makes everyone think you are shouting or that you have poor keyboarding skills.

The best way to Celebrate Caps Lock Day is quite simple, don’t use caps lock! OR YOU CAN IRONICALLY USE ALL CAPS FOR EVERYTHING TO REMIND EVERYONE NOT TO DO IT. Either way, you can always use the computers at the Moline Library to send, post and/or write whatever you want, capitalized or not.