Best Sellers Update: Holiday Gift Ideas Edition!

Do you need to buy a gift for a reader? Or someone who wants to be a reader? Or someone who is not a reader but should be?

Here is a pretty decent place to start for ideas.

NYT Best Sellers List: Combined Print & Ebook Fiction

  1. A MINUTE TO MIDNIGHT by David Baldacci (NEW)

44287119. sx318 FBI Agent Atlee Pine’s life was never the same after her twin sister Mercy was kidnapped–and likely killed–thirty years ago. After a lifetime of torturous uncertainty, Atlee’s unresolved anger finally gets the better of her on the job, and she finds she has to deal with the demons of her past if she wants to remain with the FBI. Atlee and her assistant Carol Blum head back to Atlee’s rural hometown in Georgia to see what they can uncover about the traumatic night Mercy was taken and Pine was almost killed. But soon after Atlee begins her investigation, a local woman is found ritualistically murdered, her face covered with a wedding veil–and the first killing is quickly followed by a second bizarre murder.

  1. THE GUARDIANS by John Grisham
  2. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens
  3. TWISTED TWENTY-SIX by Janet Evanovich
  4. BLUE MOON by Lee Child
  5. TOM CLANCY: CODE OF HONOR by Marc Cameron (NEW)
  6. THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
  7. THE DUTCH HOUSE by Ann Patchett
  8. THE NIGHT FIRE by Michael Connelly
  9. THE GIVER OF STARS by Jojo Moyes
  10. OLIVE, AGAIN by Elizabeth Strout
  11. ROBERT B. PARKER’S ANGEL EYES by Ace Atkins (NEW)
  12. THE INSTITUTE by Stephen King
  13. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  14. THE WATER DANCER by Ta-Nehisi Coates

5 Historical Fiction Books to Read If You Don’t Like Historical Fiction

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Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

For as long as I can remember, the historical fiction genre has been a blind spot in my life as a reader. I can never make it through the recommendations. If I had a nickel for every time I picked up and put down The Book Thief, I would be a very rich person. But then I realized that not all historical fiction novels take place in World War II and get made into major Hollywood blockbusters. In fact, according to Wikipedia, pretty much any novel that doesn’t take place in the present can be considered historical fiction—it’s just the WWII books that get the most popular. So, if you’re like me and don’t enjoy the typical “historical fiction” recs, here are five titles to check out that you might enjoy.

See the list of non-WWII historical fiction options at Book Riot.

Best Sellers List Update for National Read a Book Day!

September 6 is National Read a Book Day!

Guess how you can best celebrate the day? Here is what many other people will (apparently) be reading in case you need ideas.

NYT Best Sellers: Combined Print & E-Book Fiction

  1. A BETTER MAN by Louise Penny (NEW)

44034500It’s Gamache’s first day back as head of the homicide department, a job he temporarily shares with his previous second-in-command, Jean-Guy Beauvoir. Flood waters are rising across the province. In the middle of the turmoil a father approaches Gamache, pleading for help in finding his daughter. As the rivers rise and crisis piles upon crisis, Gamache tries to hold off the encroaching chaos.

  1. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens
  2. THE GIRL WHO LIVED TWICE by David Lagercrantz (NEW)
  3. THE DARK SIDE by Danielle Steel (NEW)
  4. SAPPHIRE FLAMES by Ilona Andrews (NEW)
  5. THE GOLDFINCH by Donna Tartt
  6. THE INN by James Patterson and Candice Fox
  7. ONE GOOD DEED by David Baldacci
  8. HOT SHOT by Fern Michaels (NEW)
  9. THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN by Garth Stein
  10. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  11. BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate
  12. LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng
  13. THE RECKONING by John Grisham
  14. OLD BONES by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Learn Your Library Resources – Adult Genre Collection

Those of you familiar with the layout of the adult collection on the second floor of the library will know that our Fiction (FIC) section is only part of our fiction collection.

Image result for genres

Genre fiction is a part of fiction, of course, but fans of certain genres like to be able to browse books it their particular area of interest. As we can’t stand the idea of not being as helpful as possible, certain genres have been separated out from the rest so that readers can do just that.

Graphic Novels, Mystery, Romance, Speculative Fiction (an umbrella term that covers Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror) and Westerns all have there own area.

It can get a little confusing sometimes when a book could fit into more than one category – genre crossovers and mash-ups were always a part of certain genres (hence grouping sci-fi, fantasy and horror together under Speculative Fiction) but they are only becoming more common – so, if you are not sure what section to look in just ask.

We are here to help!

 

 

Best Sellers Update: Read a New Book Month Edition!

December is Read a New Book Month (unless you find a website that says it is September, but just go with us here).

The weather outside is… let’s say sub-optimal. Still, there is no better time to curl up with a new book. How can you make the most of Read a New Book Month?

Well, reading a new book would be a good place to start.

‘When you say ‘new,’ do you mean ‘new‘ as in recently published or ‘new‘ as in we’ve never read it before?’ you ask.

Yes.

Also, for those of you feeling adventurous, you can read something new AND different. Safe bet books, that you know you’ll love are, of course, a wonderful thing, but sometimes it is exciting to mix things up.

Regardless of what you choose to do, here are the current NYT Best Sellers (Fiction and Non-Fiction) to give you some inspiration.

NYT Best Sellers: Combined Print & E-Book Fiction

  1. FIRE AND BLOOD by George R.R. Martin (NEW)

39943621Centuries before the events of A Game of Thrones, House Targaryen—the only family of dragonlords to survive the Doom of Valyria—took up residence on Dragonstone. Fire and Blood begins their tale with the legendary Aegon the Conqueror, creator of the Iron Throne, and goes on to recount the generations of Targaryens who fought to hold that iconic seat, all the way up to the civil war that nearly tore their dynasty apart.

  1. TARGET: ALEX CROSS by James Patterson (NEW)
  2. THE RECKONING by John Grisham
  3. DARK SACRED NIGHT by Michael Connelly
  4. LOOK ALIVE TWENTY-FIVE by Janet Evanovich
  5. PAST TENSE by Lee Child
  6. EVERY BREATH by Nicholas Sparks
  7. LONG ROAD TO MERCY by David Baldacci
  8. BEAUCHAMP HALL by Danielle Steel (NEW)
  9. NINE PERFECT STRANGERS by Liane Moriarty
  10. THE OTHER MISS BRIDGERTON by Julia Quinn (NEW)
  11. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens
  12. ELEVATION by Stephen King
  13. THE NEXT PERSON YOU MEET IN HEAVEN by Mitch Albom
  14. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris

 

NYT Best Sellers: Combined Print & E-Book Non-Fiction

  1. BECOMING by Michelle Obama

BecomingIn a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

  1. KILLING THE SS by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard
  2. EDUCATED by Tara Westover
  3. SHIP OF FOOLS by Tucker Carlson
  4. FACTFULNESS by Hans Rosling with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Ronnlund
  5. SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari
  6. FEAR by Bob Woodward
  7. CHURCHILL: WALKING WITH DESTINY by Andrew Roberts (NEW)
  8. LEADERSHIP by Doris Kearns Goodwin
  9. IN PIECES by Sally Field
  10. SHADE by Pete Souza
  11. THE FIFTH RISK by Michael Lewis
  12. THE LIBRARY BOOK by Susan Orlean
  13. BRIEF ANSWERS TO THE BIG QUESTIONS by Stephen Hawking
  14. BEASTIE BOYS BOOK by Michael Diamond and Adam Horovitz

Best Sellers List: October Update

Combined Print & E-Book Fiction

  1. LETHAL WHITE by Robert Galbraith (NEW)

28170940When Billy, a troubled young man, comes to private eye Cormoran Strike’s office to ask for his help investigating a crime he thinks he witnessed as a child, Strike is left deeply unsettled. While Billy is obviously mentally distressed, and cannot remember many concrete details, there is something sincere about him and his story. But before Strike can question him further, Billy bolts from his office in a panic.

  1. TIME’S CONVERT by Deborah Harkness (NEW)
  2. ORIGIN by Dan Brown
  3. JUROR #3 by James Patterson and Nancy Allen
  4. CRAZY RICH ASIANS by Kevin Kwan
  5. WHY NOT TONIGHT by Susan Mallery (NEW)
  6. VAMPIRES LIKE IT HOT by Lynsay Sands (NEW)
  7. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens
  8. CHINA RICH GIRLFRIEND by Kevin Kwan
  9. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  10. TAILSPIN by Sandra Brown
  11. LEVERAGE IN DEATH by J.D. Robb
  12. SHADOW TYRANTS by Clive Cussler and Boyd Morrison
  13. A SIMPLE FAVOR by Darcey Bell
  14. RICH PEOPLE PROBLEMS by Kevin Kwan

Books to Film: October Edition

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

32075671The Hate U Give poster.jpgMovie: The Hate U Give
When it comes out: October 5
What the book is about: Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

 

The Old Man & the Gun (essay featured in The Devil and Sherlock Holmes) by David Grann

7150397The Old Man & the Gun.pngMovie: The Old Man & the Gun
When it comes out: October 5
What the book is about: Each of the dozen stories in this collection reveals a hidden and often dangerous world and, like Into Thin Air and The Orchid Thief, pivots around the gravitational pull of obsession and the captivating personalities of those caught in its grip. There is the world’s foremost expert on Sherlock Holmes who is found dead in mysterious circumstances; an arson sleuth trying to prove that a man about to be executed is innocent, and sandhogs racing to complete the brutally dangerous job of building New York City’s water tunnels before the old system collapses. Throughout, Grann’s hypnotic accounts display the power-and often the willful perversity-of the human spirit.

 

Loving Pablo, Hating Escobar by Virginia Vallejo

41130805Loving Pablo.jpgMovie: Loving Pablo
When it comes out: October 5
What the book is about: At 33, Virginia Vallejo was media elite. A renowned anchorwoman and socialite, and a model who appeared on magazine covers worldwide, Vallejo was the darling of Colombia’s most powerful politicians and billionaires. Meeting Pablo Escobar in 1983, and becoming his mistress for many years, she witnessed the rise of a drug empire that was characterized by Escobar’s far-reaching political corruption, his extraordinary wealth, and a network of violent crime that lasted until his death in 1993. In this highly personal and insightful story, Vallejo characterizes the duality of Escobar’s charm and charisma as a benefactor to the people of Colombia, and the repulsion of his criminal actions as a tyrannical terrorist and enemy of many world leaders.

 

First Man by James R. Hansen

205589First Man (film).pngMovie: First Man
When it comes out: October 12
What the book is about: On July 20, 1969, the world stood still to watch thirty-eight-year-old American astronaut Neil A. Armstrong become the first person to step on the surface of another heavenly body. Perhaps no words in human history became better known than those few he uttered at that historic moment. In a penetrating exploration of American hero worship, Hansen addresses the complex legacy of the First Man, as an astronaut and an individual.

 

Break My Heart 1,000 Times by Daniel Waters

13455504Image result for I Still See You (film)Movie: I Still See You
When it comes out: 
October 12
What the book is about: 
Living in the aftermath of the Event means that seeing the dead is now a part of life, but Veronica wishes that the ghosts would just move on. Instead, the ghosts aren’t disappearing-they’re gaining power. When Veronica and her friend, Kirk, decide to investigate why, they stumble upon a more sinister plot than they ever could have imagined.

 

Can You Ever Forgive Me? by Lee Israel

3354989Can You Ever Forgive Me?.pngMovie: Can You Ever Forgive Me?
When it comes out: October 19
What the book is about: Before turning to her life of crime—running a one-woman forgery business out of a phone booth in a Greenwich Village bar and even dodging the FBI—Lee Israel had a legitimate career as an author of biographies. Her first book on Tallulah Bankhead was a New York Times bestseller, and her second, on the late journalist and reporter Dorothy Kilgallen, made a splash in the headlines. But by 1990, almost broke and desperate to hang onto her Upper West Side studio, Lee made a bold and irreversible career change: inspired by a letter she’d received once from Katharine Hepburn, and armed with her considerable skills as a researcher and celebrity biographer, she began to forge letters in the voices of literary greats.

 

Firing Point by Don Keith & George Wallace

13542604Hunter Killer film poster.jpgMovie: Hunter Killer
When it comes out: October 26
What the book is about: Below the polar ice cap, an American nuclear submarine moves quietly in the freezing water, tailing a new Russian sub. But the usual, unspoken game of hide-and-seek between opposing captains is ended when the Americans hear sounds of disaster and flooding, and the Russian sub sinks in a thousand feet of water. The American sub rushes to help, only to join its former quarry in the deep. The situation ignites tensions around the world. As both Washington and Moscow prepare for what may be the beginnings of World War III, the USS Toledo—led by young, untested Captain Joe Glass—heads to the location to give aid. He soon discovers that the incident was no accident. And the men behind it have yet to make their final move.

 

Barn Burning (short story featured in The Elephant Vanishes) by Haruki Murakami

9555Burning.pngMovie: Burning
When it comes out: October 26
What the book is about: With the same deadpan mania and genius for dislocation that he brought to his internationally acclaimed novels A Wild Sheep Chase and Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, Haruki Murakami makes this collection of stories a determined assault on the normal. A man sees his favorite elephant vanish into thin air; a newlywed couple suffers attacks of hunger that drive them to hold up a McDonald’s in the middle of the night; and a young woman discovers that she has become irresistible to a little green monster who burrows up through her backyard.

Genre Friday – Gothic Fiction

Is it Gothic Fiction?

Is it dark (in tone or in luminous intensity)?

Usually.

Is it creepy in an undeniable, but sometimes indefinite, way?

Most of the time.

Is death featured heavily, either as an event or preoccupation?

Absolutely.

Does it leave you with a deep distrust of old, palatial manners, moldering estates, dilapidated plantation homes and crumbly castles?

It would have if I weren’t already freaked out by those places.  

Is it focused on an individual (or small group or family) and their thoughts and feelings as they try to deal with everything listed above without going completely insane?

Yup.

That’s Gothic Fiction alright. This genre looked at the rugged individualism, intense emotions, introspection and focus on nature and the past (in particular the medieval period) of Romanticism and said, ‘Yeah, but where is all the deep, existential and psychological terror and death?’ It’s not necessarily terrifying in the way traditional Horror is but it will almost certainly get your skin crawling at some point. Or at least make you look over your shoulder as you walk down dark and deserted hallways, should you have occasion to do so.

Now that we have that established the real question is, where is it set? For Gothic Fiction, setting is what determines subgenre – American (or, more specifically, Southern), English or Space (you read that right, space).

American Gothic

As you would assume, we’re dealing with American settings here — the frontier or wild west, the deep south, sometimes even suburbia. The stories often explore the darker parts of American culture and history; slavery, war, genocide and the exploitation of the nation’s natural resources and wilderness come up fairly regularly. Horror is there in some form or another, but it isn’t always supernatural (as people are more than capable of being horrifying on there own), and when it is, it might be implied rather than clearly identified. This brings in the unreliable narrator and mental illness, which is another common theme in American Gothic stories. Set it in the sweltering southern heat, and liberally sprinkle in racial tension, degradation, and poverty left over from the Reconstruction era and you have Southern Gothic.

Examples:

The cover of the book We Have Always Lived in the CastleThe Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allen Poe

Sanctuary by William Faulkner

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Wieland by Charles Brockden Brown

Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor

English Gothic

Grappling with mental illness or spiritual angst, while dodging ghosts on the windswept moors or in a crumbling tower? In England? You’re in an English Gothic story. Watch out for untimely death, doomed romance, and villainous depravity – if it hasn’t happened already, it’s only a matter time. And, this probably goes without saying but, try to stay out of neglected graveyards, cobwebbed dungeons and, of course, haunted castles.

Examples:

The cover of the book The Castle of OtrantoThe Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Racliffe

Gothic Space Opera

You know those sci-fi stories where civilization and technology extended so far and so fast that when it eventually and inevitably collapsed the average person was suddenly left stranded in a pseudo-medieval, superstitious and decaying society despite the fact that they live on an alien planet or massive star ship? Well, they’re out there, and they are frequently the starting point for these Gothic Space stories.

In these cases, the rickety star ship serves as haunted mansion/castle analog and the inky, vast blackness of space the misty, eerie moors that surround typically surround them. Authoritarian regimes, oppressive cults and demonic alien forces are common issues, as well as the usual wear and tear of long space travel — time dilation, the assumption of death-like states of suspended animation, and the dementia-inducing isolation of space travel, to name a few examples — on human relationships and sanity are frequent topics.

Examples:

The cover of the book The Burning DarkBlindsight by Peter Watts

The Burning Dark by Adam Christopher

The Explorer by James Smythe

Hyperion by Dan Simmons

Nightflyers by George R. R. Martin

Solaris by Stanislaw Lem

 

Best Sellers: June Update – DELUXE SUMMER READING EDITION

The New York Times Best Sellers List

Combined Print & E-Book Fiction

  1. THE OUTSIDER by Stephen King (NEW)

36000789An eleven-year-old boy is found in a town park, hideously assaulted and murdered. The fingerprints (and later DNA) are unmistakably those of the town’s most popular baseball coach, Terry Maitland, a man of impeccable reputation, with a wife and two daughters. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland coached, orders an immediate and public arrest. Maitland is taken to jail, his claim to innocence scorned. Maitland has a foolproof alibi, with footage to prove that he was in another city when the crime was committed. But that doesn’t save him either.

  1. THE 17TH SUSPECT by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro

The latest installment in the Women’s Murder Club series. Detective Lindsay Boxer searches for a killer in San Francisco.

  1. THE FALLEN by David Baldacci

Amos Decker, known as the Memory Man, puts his talents toward solving a string of murders in a Rust Belt town.

  1. BEACH HOUSE REUNION by Mary Alice Monroe (NEW)

Three generations of a family gather one summer in South Carolina.

  1. THE CAST by Danielle Steel

A magazine columnist meets an array of Hollywood professionals when a producer turns a story about her grandmother into a TV series.

  1. REBEL HEART by Penelope Ward and Vi Keeland (NEW)

A sequel to “Rebel Heir.” The summer fling between Rush and Gia continues.

  1. THE MIDNIGHT LINE by Lee Child

Jack Reacher tracks down the owner of a pawned West Point class ring and stumbles upon a large criminal enterprise.

  1. LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng

An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

  1. ROGUE ROYALTY by Meghan March (NEW)

The final book in the Savage trilogy.

  1. BEFORE WE WERE YOURS by Lisa Wingate

A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

  1. TWISTED PREY by John Sandford

The 28th book in the Prey series. A federal marshal looks into the actions of a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

  1. THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR by Shari Lapena

A couple’s secrets emerge after their baby disappears.

  1. THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah

A former prisoner of war returns from Vietnam and moves his family to Alaska, where they face tough conditions.

  1. BY INVITATION ONLY by Dorothea Benton Frank

Two families are brought together when the daughter of a Chicago power broker and the son of a Southern peach farmer decide to wed.

  1. THE HIGH TIDE CLUB by Mary Kay Andrews

An eccentric millionaire enlists the attorney Brooke Trappnell to fix old wrongs, which sets up a potential scandal and murder.

 

Combined Print & E-Book Nonfiction

  1. THE RESTLESS WAVE by John McCain and Mark Salter (NEW)

36254351“I don’t know how much longer I’ll be here. Maybe I’ll have another five years. Maybe, with the advances in oncology, they’ll find new treatments for my cancer that will extend my life. Maybe I’ll be gone before you read this. My predicament is, well, rather unpredictable. But I’m prepared for either contingency, or at least I’m getting prepared. I have some things I’d like to take care of first, some work that needs finishing, and some people I need to see. And I want to talk to my fellow Americans a little more if I may.” So writes John McCain in this inspiring, moving, frank, and deeply personal memoir. 

  1. FACTS AND FEARS by James R. Clapper with Trey Brown (NEW)

The former director of national intelligence describes events that challenged the intelligence community and considers some ethical questions around its efforts.

  1. THE SOUL OF AMERICA by Jon Meacham

The Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer contextualizes the present political climate through the lens of difficult moments in American history.

  1. HOW TO CHANGE YOUR MIND by Michael Pollan

A personal account of how psychedelics might help the mentally ill and people dealing with everyday challenges.

  1. BARRACOON by Zora Neale Hurston

A previously unpublished, first-person account of Cudjo Lewis, a man who was transported and enslaved 50 years after the slave trade was banned.

  1. BAD BLOOD by John Carreyrou (NEW)

The rise and fall of Theranos, the biotech startup that failed to deliver on its promise to make blood testing more efficient.

  1. A HIGHER LOYALTY by James Comey

The former F.B.I. director recounts cases and personal events that shaped his outlook on justice, and analyzes the leadership styles of three presidents.

  1. KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON by David Grann

The story of a murder spree in 1920s Oklahoma that targeted Osage Indians, whose lands contained oil.

  1. SAPIENS by Yuval Noah Harari

How Homo sapiens became Earth’s dominant species.

  1. EDUCATED by Tara Westover

The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

  1. HILLBILLY ELEGY by J.D. Vance

A Yale Law School graduate looks at the struggles of the white working class through the story of his own childhood.

  1. I’LL BE GONE IN THE DARK by Michelle McNamara

The late true-crime journalist’s search for the serial murderer and rapist known as “the Golden State Killer.”

  1. THREE DAYS IN MOSCOW by Bret Baier and Catherine Whitney

The Fox News anchor describes Ronald Reagan’s 1988 visit to the Soviet capital.

  1. FACTFULNESS by Hans Rosling with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Ronnlund

A look at our biases and the argument for why the world is in a better state than we might think.

  1. ROBIN by Dave Itzkoff

A New York Times journalist details the career and struggles of the actor and comedian Robin Williams.

Does reading fiction make you a better person?

Yes. Yes, it does.

Study Links Reading Fiction to Better Performance on Empathy and Social Acumen Tests

“When we read about other people, we can imagine ourselves into their position and we can imagine it’s like being that person,” one of the studies organizers said. “That enables us to better understand people, better cooperate with them.”

Angel Reading

Rev. Alvan Bond, D.D. Young People’s Illustrated Bible History (Norwich, CT: The Henry Bill Publishing Company, 1875) frontispiece

“[It’s like] being in a flight simulator: ‘You experience a lot of situations in a short span of time,’ [a cognitive psychologist involved in the study] said, far more so than if we went about our lives waiting for those experiences to come to us.”

You can click here for the whole article.

There you are, conclusive proof that going to the library can not only help make you a better informed and better educated person, but make you a better person period. Indirectly, at least.

And don’t worry if you’re not a reader – it turns out is doesn’t actually have to be a book. It seems that: “This phenomenon is probably form neutral — studies of people viewing dramatic television shows, or playing immersive, narrative video games, found that they had the same effect as reading literature.” And we’ve got those too.