Books to Film: June 2018

Tag, He’s ‘It’ for Another Year by Russel Adams (of The Wall Street Journal)

Image result for wsjTag (2018 film).pngMovie: Tag
When it comes out: June 15
What the book is about: Okay. So it’s not from a book, but it is based on a true story that was written about in the Wall Street Journal.

The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers

13366259The Yellow Birds.jpgMovie: The Yellow Birds
When it comes out: June 15
What the book is about: “The war tried to kill us in the spring,” begins this breathtaking account of friendship and loss. In Al Tafar, Iraq, twenty-one-year old Private Bartle and eighteen-year-old Private Murphy cling to life as their platoon launches a bloody battle for the city. In the endless days that follow, the two young soldiers do everything to protect each other from the forces that press in on every side: the insurgents, physical fatigue, and the mental stress that comes from constant danger.

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer

6604712Eating Animals (2017)Movie: Eating Animals
When it comes out: June 15
What the book is about: Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them. Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill.

The Catcher Was a Spy by Nicholas Dawidoff

34629The Catcher Was a Spy.pngMovie: The Catcher Was a Spy
When it comes out: June 22
What the book is about: The only Major League ballplayer whose baseball card is on display at the headquarters of the CIA, Moe Berg has the singular distinction of having both a 15-year career as a catcher for such teams as the New York Robins and the Chicago White Sox and that of a spy for the OSS during World War II. Here, Dawidoff provides “a careful and sympathetic biography” (Chicago Sun-Times) of this enigmatic man.

 

 

 

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19 ‘Great American Read’ Picks That Have Been Made Into Classic Movies

“The Great American Read” is an eight-part television and online series designed to spark a national conversation about reading and the books they’ve selected. Hosted by Meredith Vieira, the series features 100 books that have inspired, moved, and shaped us. The goal is for viewers to read the books and vote from the list of 100, advocating for their favorite read.

“The Great American Read” premieres Tuesday, May 22 at 8/7c on PBS stations. Voting will be open through the summer and into the fall, when seven new episodes of the series will air as the quest to find America’s most beloved book moves into high gear.

We at Signature scavenged through the nominated books to find that many of them have been adapted into classic movies that you’ve probably seen. If you know us, you know we are big fans of reading the book first. Check out the list we’ve curated below, culled from the list of 100, note the movies you’ve seen and the books you’ve read, and be sure to tune in to “The Great American Read” on PBS.

 

The cover of the book A Prayer for Owen MeanyA Prayer for Owen Meany

John Irving

This classic John Irving novel explores what happens when unthinkable tragedy strikes two eleven-year-old boys in 1963, when the best friends are playing a little league game, and one of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy’s mother. Owen Meany, the boy who hit the ball, happens to not believe in accidents, and so he thinks his action was God’s will. The Mark Steven Johnson-directed 1998 film “Simon Birch” was loosely based on Owen Meany, so much so that they don’t share the same name.

 

The cover of the book Charlotte's WebCharlotte’s Web

E.B. White

You are likely to have seen “Charlotte’s Web,” whether the 1973 animated version, or the 2006 live-action starring Dakota Fanning, Julia Roberts, and Oprah Winfrey. And it’s likely you’ve read the book as well, but a beloved children’s classic like this one always warrants a re-read. The story of Wilbur, Fern, and Charlotte’s friendship has withstood the test of time as a tale of bravery, sacrifice, and the power of love.

 

The cover of the book The Count of Monte CristoThe Count of Monte Cristo

Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas’s classic story of Edmond Dantes’ wrongful imprisonment and subsequent escape to the Isle of Monte Cristo in search of buried treasure was inspired by a true case of wrongful imprisonment, and remains relevant to this day. It was most recently adapted in 2002 into a fairly well-liked film starring Jim Caviezel and Guy Pearce, but we recommend returning to the source material.

 

The cover of the book Don QuixoteDon Quixote

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

Now, this is one we should all see: Terry Gilliams’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” (when it comes out in late 2018, that is). Until then, we can sate ourselves with the 2000 TNT television adaptation starring John Lithgow, Bob Hoskins, and Isabella Rossellini. Oh, and we can read the book. Don Quixote tells the tale of the exploits of Don Quixote and his faithful squire, Sancho Panza, after Quixote takes it upon himself to become chivalry embodied.

 

The cover of the book FrankensteinFrankenstein

Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley’s classic novel Frankenstein, about Victor Frankenstein and the monster he creates, has inspired countless adaptations. Our personal favorite is the 1935 film “Bride of Frankenstein” starring Elsa Lanchester, but to each their own. And we can’t wait for the upcoming historical biopic “Mary Shelley” starring Elle Fanning as Shelley, either. But again, in the meantime, let’s take to the books and read (or reread) the source material.

 

The cover of the book The GodfatherThe Godfather

Mario Puzo

Our guess is, you’ve seen “The Godfather,” but you haven’t read The Godfather. And we don’t blame you—that’s completely understandable. Clocking in at 448 pages, Mario Puzo’s classic saga of American crime family the Corleone’s is a daunting book to add to your TBR, and the 1972 adaptation starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, and James Caan is just so good. But go ahead, take a walk on the wild side and pick up this doorstopper from your local library (or maybe just download it on your e-reader). We promise you won’t regret it.

 

The cover of the book Gone with the WindGone with the Wind

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 classic may have been assigned to you in high school English, but if you read the Sparknotes or watched the Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh-starring 1939 film adaptation, we won’t judge you. That adaptation is pure gold—it’s actually even got a 92% on Rotten Tomatoes—but please, we beseech you, give the book a try. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and one of the bestselling novels of all time, there’s a reason why Mitchell’s novel has stood the test of time.

 

The cover of the book The Grapes of WrathThe Grapes of Wrath

John Steinbeck

The 1940 adaptation of John Steinbeck’s classic starring Henry Fonda is a masterpiece in its own right, to be sure. But Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning chronicle of the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s through the lens of the Joad family paints a compelling portrait of the struggle between those who have power and those who do not in America that persists to this day, and is worth a read of its own.

 

The cover of the book Great ExpectationsGreat Expectations

Charles Dickens

There’s a lot to choose from when it comes to adaptations of Charles Dickens’s 1861 classic, from the 1998 film starring Gwyneth Paltrow as Estella and Ethan Hawke as Pip to the more recent 2012 adaptation, memorably starring Helena Bonham Carter as Miss Havisham. But we at Signature are big fans of reading Dickens, and Great Expectations is a particular favorite of ours. Dickens’s sprawling tale of the life of a boy (and then man) transformed by a mysterious and enormous inheritance is a must-read.

 

The cover of the book The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Okay, you’ve probably read this one. And if not, please change that immediately. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s tale of a man consumed by love (ahem, obsession) may be overplayed, but with good reason. Those of you divided between love for the Leo DiCaprio-starring 2013 adaptation and the Robert Redford and Mia Farrow-starring 1974 adaptation will find common ground in Fitzgerald’s expertly-weaved original text.

 

The cover of the book Heart of DarknessHeart of Darkness

Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness tells the thrilling tale of Marlow, a seaman who travels into the heart of Africa in search of the infamous ivory trader Kurtz, who has gained an unexplainable amount of power over the local people. We want to disclose something: the 1979 film we are recommending, “Apocalypse Now,” was inspired by Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, but deviates extensively from the book. Don’t freak out without giving it a watch. Today, it’s considered to be one of the greatest films ever made.

 

The cover of the book The Hunt for Red OctoberThe Hunt for Red October

Tom Clancy

If you haven’t taken the time to dive into Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan thrillers, this is the perfect time to start. The Hunt for Red October introduced the world to Clancy’s unforgettable hero, Jack Ryan, and follows him as he races to find a highly advanced nuclear submarine before the Russians get their hands on it. The 1984 film was the first of several films based on the novels, and stars Alec Baldwin as CIA analyst Ryan and Sean Connery as Soviet submarine commander Marko Ramius.

 

The cover of the book Little WomenLittle Women

Louisa May Alcott

Little Women famously follows the lives of the four March sisters — Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy — who couldn’t be more different from one another. But when their father is sent to fight in the war, their mother works to support the family, and the girls must learn to rely on one another. Though the 1933 film is the third screen adaptation of the book, it’s the first one with sound. That’s why we advise starting your “Little Women” journey with the 1933 film, and then moving on to the 1949 version, with June Allyson, Elizabeth Taylor, and Peter Lawford, and finally the 1994 adaptation, starring the talented Winona Ryder.

 

The cover of the book Moby-DickMoby-Dick (or, The Whale)

Herman Melville

“Call me Ishmael” — this famous line begins one of the most renowned journeys in literature. Moby Dick centers on a whaling ship named the Pequod and its Captain, Ahab, as he sails for revenge against Moby Dick, a sperm whale that destroyed Ahab’s former vessel and left him crippled. John Huston’s 1956 film adaptation remains faithful to the book, unlike previous versions that included romantic subplots and happy endings. So if you want to watch the story unfold on the screen, be sure to check out John Huston’s adaptation.

 

The cover of the book The Outsiders 50th Anniversary EditionThe Outsiders

S.E. Hinton

First published in 1967, S. E. Hinton’s novel was an immediate phenomenon, and continues to resonate with readers more than fifty years later. It’s a coming-of-age story that follows Ponyboy’s experiences in a world divided into two groups: the Socs (rich kids who can get away with anything), and the greasers, who aren’t so lucky. Basically, if you haven’t read it yet, get yourself a copy and do so immediately. Then, be sure to watch the 1983 film, which is noted for its cast of up-and-coming stars, including C. Thomas Howell, Rob Lowe, Emilio Estevez, Matt Dillon, Tom Cruise, Patrick Swayze, Ralph Macchio, and Diane Lane.

 

The cover of the book The Picture of Dorian GrayThe Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray is a classic read, and though it was published in 1890, it still resonates with readers today. The story centers around Dorian, who is an extremely wealthy and good-looking young man living in London. Dorian has a portrait of himself done by the great artist Basil and becomes obsessed with his own handsome, youthful appearance – so much so that he sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. The book was originally attacked for exposing the dark side of Victorian society, and for evoking ideas of homosexuality. Released in March 1945 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, the film, shot mostly in black and white, was directed by Albert Lewin and stars George Sanders as Lord Henry Wotton, and Hurd Hatfield as Dorian Gray.

 

The cover of the book Pride and PrejudicePride and Prejudice

Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is one of the most well-known novels in the United States and around the world. With the most compelling of stories and the most memorable of characters, it has remained unparalleled for two hundred years. Readers will find themselves immersed in the Bennet family, comprising a quiet father, a dutiful mother, and five beautiful daughters. Grand country estates, beautiful young men and women, and unwavering courtship all comprise this endearing story of heartache and romance. The film was released on July 26, 1940, and was critically well-received. It’s definitely a story that’s worth reading and watching, if you haven’t already done so.

 

The cover of the book To Kill a MockingbirdTo Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee

Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece is a compelling coming-of-age tale set in the south. It’s told from the point of view of a young girl who watches as her father, a local lawyer, risks everything to defend an innocent black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime. We insist that you watch the highly-ranked 1962 film — directed by Robert Mulligan, it was a box-office success and won three Academy Awards.

 

The cover of the book War and PeaceWar and Peace

Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace takes place during Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and follows three of the most well-known characters in literature: Pierre Bezukhov, the illegitimate son of a count who is fighting for his inheritance; Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, who leaves his family behind to fight in the war against Napoleon; and Natasha Rostov, the beautiful young daughter of a nobleman who intrigues both men. We recommend the 1956 film directed by King Vidor which stars big names like Audrey Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer, and Anita Ekberg, in one of her first breakthrough roles. It had several Academy Awards nominations, and should definitely be on your list of must-watch classic movies.

What should the Avengers read?

by Cassie Hall, et al., April 24, 2018, first appearing on Novelist Blog

Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War opened in the U.S. last weekend, and its sprawling cast of heroes and villains offers an irresistible readers’ advisory opportunity. Below, NoveList staff share book recommendations for their favorite MCU characters.

T’Challa (Black Panther)

Oh, T’Challa, we love you, and want to pick the perfect books for you. Bear with me, I have a lot of thoughts here. First, I choose the graphic novel Malika: Warrior Queen, by Roye Okupe. Malika, like T’Challa, is a warrior and ruler in Africa, with strong ties to her countrymen (and, hello, graphic novel?). To embrace his love of Wakanda, a nation that thrives on its technological advancements, T’Challa would likely enjoy Everfair, by Nisi Shawl, a steampunk story set in Africa. T’Challa obviously has the utmost respect for the strong women in his life — Shuri, Nakia, Okoye — so chances are he would enjoy books featuring strong female protagonists. How about the Akata Witch fantasy series by Nnedi Okorafor? And, since he’s so totally awesome, he would share his books with his fellow Wakandans (or donate them to the public library when he finished them). –Suzanne Temple

Shuri

I’m assuming that Shuri, the smartest person in the MCU (fight me), has already read allllll the STEM books, and so I think she might want to try something different. Daniel José Older’s Shadowshaper Cypher series features several elements that will feel familiar to Shuri — ancestral magic, people with unusual abilities, and a powerful heroine — but it’s set in contemporary Brooklyn, the kind of place that Shuri can explore now that Wakanda has emerged from isolation. Also, while she clearly doesn’t need fashion advice, Shuri might enjoy browsing Amber Keyser’s Sneaker Century. –Rebecca Honeycutt

Bucky Barnes (Winter Soldier)

Much like his BFF (truly…these guys are old) Steve Rogers, Bucky will eventually need to catch up on pop culture. What better way to get him up to speed than by exploring concepts close to his heart? Chuck Klosterman’s witty and thought-provoking essay collection I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined) explores pop culture villains like Bernhard Goetz and Darth Vader, and asks such philosophical questions as: Where do we draw the line between hero and villain? What does it mean to be a villain? Speaking of pop culture, Bucky is probably still confused about Tony Stark calling him “Manchurian Candidate” in Captain America: Civil War, so he should read Richard Condon’s nail-biter thriller as well – after all, he can empathize with Raymond Shaw, the Korean War veteran who returns home brainwashed to serve nefarious purposes. –Kaitlin Conner

Now that he’s free from the grips of Hydra’s brainwashing and has a sweet new (vibranium???) arm courtesy of Shuri, Bucky really just needs a hug. Call me Katniss because I VOLUNTEER. But seriously, someone get this guy a cozy blanket, a stack of Shel Silverstein books, and throw on some Bob Ross in the background. –Cassi Hall

Steve Rogers (Captain America)

History repeats itself, and Steve Rogers understands this more than most. He’d appreciate Timothy’s Snyder’s On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, which offers examples of how to protect democracy from authoritarian and totalitarian regimes, drawing parallels between current events and 20th century threats like the rise of fascism and Nazism in Europe. Timely, reflective, and most importantly, concise — at 128 pages, it can be finished in one sitting — On Tyranny is the perfect read for Steve, a man ready to save the world but without a lot of time to spare. –Kaitlin Conner

Thor

Our very own Norse god! The obvious choice for Thor would be Norse Gods, by Neil Gaiman, but let’s face it — he would spend his time picking it apart. He may enjoy another Neil Gaiman book inspired by mythology: American Gods. Obviously, Rick Riordan’s Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard series would be a fun read, but you know he’d be getting into arguments with every Riordan fan he encountered, because he’s a god and thinks he knows everything. If this happens, steer clear of Thor, kids! –Suzanne Temple

Loki

Poor Loki. It’s hard when everyone sees your brother as the stronger, virtuous one, and you are the black sheep. He may feel that his path is set, and there’s no turning back. Did anyone ever tell him he’s loved? I believe the words and aphorisms of Mister Rogers can crack even the hardest heart. Loki should read The World According to Mister Rogers to learn his value and worth in the cosmos. Maybe it will inspire him to see the upcoming documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, too. –Lindsey Dunn

Pepper Potts

Pepper is a successful, high-powered businesswoman who’s likely spent years enduring the casual and not-so-casual sexism of corporate America, so I think she’d get a kick out of Penelope Bagieu’s Brazen, a collection of short comics profiling both famous and lesser-known women who forged various paths in directions they weren’t expected to go.  –Kendal Spires

James “Rhodey” Rhodes (War Machine)

In between striking up a formative friendship with Tony Stark at MIT and stepping into the War Machine suit in Iron Man 2, James Rhodes pursued a successful career in the U.S. Air Force. Given that background, Rhodey would likely enjoy the insight of Redeployment, fellow vet Phil Klay’s National Book Award-winning collection of short stories told in and around the Iraq War. –Kendal Spires

Natasha Romanoff (Black Widow)

Resident superspy (and former KGB agent) Natasha Romanoff would likely find upcoming thriller Star of the North compelling. Featuring a CIA agent infiltrating North Korea to track down her twin sister (who was abducted by North Korean operatives 20 years ago), this suspenseful and realistic exploration of an elusive government will appeal to Natasha, a woman all-too-used to a life in the shadows — and to going to great lengths to protect those she loves. –Kaitlin Conner

Natasha’s been in the spy game for a long time, and would find something to relate to in the exploits of Tara Chace, another espionage veteran and the protagonist of Greg Rucka’s classic Queen and Country comics. The series depicts both tense missions in the field and bureaucratic maneuvering in the office, and Natasha might even find it refreshing to read some straight-up spy tales that don’t involve superheroic dramatics. –Kendal Spires

Peter Quill (Star Lord)

At this point, it’s an understatement to say that Peter Quill has daddy issues; I wouldn’t blame him if he decides to keep up the charade that his real father is David Hasselhoff. If Peter’s still looking for solace, he might find it in the Hoff’s upbeat autobiography. Don’t Hassel the Hoff is at turns self-deprecating and self-congratulatory (sound familiar?) and, per Kirkus Reviews, “covers [Hasselhoff’s] life in standard greatest-hits format” — a narrative structure music lover Peter would dig.  Reviews aren’t the greatest, but since when does Peter care about reviews? At the very least, he can catch up on the life of the father he wishes he had. –Kaitlin Conner

No one knows better than Peter Quill the maxim that “everything old is new again” (see: his treasured mixtapes, his love of sitcom tropes). No book explores pop culture’s cyclical nature quite like Ernest Cline’s nostalgic, action-packed Ready Player One (and its recent film adaptation), in which teenager Wade Watts escapes his dystopian world in 2044 for a virtual one that embodies 1980s pop culture. Self-made superhero Peter — call him “Star-Lord,” thank you very much — would see a kindred spirit in Wade, whose alliterative name is meant to recall superheroes of yore and whose passion for 1980s pop culture is unparalleled.  –Kaitlin Conner

While I agree that Peter/Star Lord has daddy issues and loves all things nostalgic, if he’s at all representative of a male brain, what is really on his mind right now is a more practical, pressing matter. Now that Gamora seems ready to open her heart, how can he form and maintain a good relationship with her? It would be my duty as a librarian to guide him to the relationship book section. Mating Intelligence Unleased by Glenn Geher should do the trick. He has a lot of intelligence to gain in this ignored area of his life.  –Lindsey Dunn

Clint Barton (Hawkeye)

Clint is possibly the only hero not present on the massively overpopulated Infinity War poster (having apparently been sick on Avengers class picture day or something), an amusing omission that puts me in mind of his more hapless counterpart and his canine sidekick Lucky in Matt Fraction and David Aja’s Hawkeye comics. Assuming MCU Clint holds a similar affection for dogs, I’d hand him John Grogan’s Marley and Me, because who doesn’t love crying their eyes out over someone else’s dog? –Kendal Spires

Peter Parker (Spider-Man)

Poor Peter Parker. He was just a sweet, nerdy kid, minding his own business, until — BAM! — he’s bitten by a spider and life is forever changed. I know for a fact (yes, a fact!) that Peter loves a good, goofy comic. Since he already lives the superhero life, I would recommend the Rick and Morty comics for a healthy dose of offbeat humor. –Suzanne Temple

Special mention (and possible spoiler): Miles Morales is incredibly serious, so would surely enjoy Game, by Walter Dean Myers. Miles and Drew both have strong families, live in New York, and are likeable characters who are just trying to keep their noses clean. –Suzanne Temple

Bruce Banner (Hulk)

This dude has some problems, and no one understands him. They think he’s just a big, green lunkhead inside a guy who can’t control his anger. Some obvious classics come to mind (The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Frankenstein, The Island of Dr. Moreau), but as Dr. Banner is a very learned scientist, chances are he has already read these titles. To help him not feel so alone, Hulk would enjoy The Only Child, by Andrew Pyper, a take on multiple classic characters within one monster. Being the genius he is, Bruce Banner would want to hear about the scientific aspect of good and evil, so he would like The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil, by Philip G. Zimbardo. (Honestly, though, how much of a genius could Bruce Banner be if he can’t take the proper precautions when doing his experiments?) –Suzanne Temple

For all the Avengers:

Ok, I’ll be honest. I really just wanted to make this recommendation and the more I thought about it, the more I believe that all of the finally-assembled Avengers would take something away from it. Worm is a completed web serial by the author known as Wildbow and clocks in at roughly 1,750,000 words. It’s a dark, complex, wildly imaginative superhero story that surprises (and often, shocks) at every turn. I will offer a warning that the word count isn’t the only reason Worm is not for the faint of heart — some of the more villainous parahumans (powered people) take on names like Jack Slash, Bonesaw, Hatchet Face, Acidbath, Lung, Murder Rat…and yes, they’re all even worse than they sound. Seriously, if you think you’ve seen it all when it comes to superheroes, superpowers, and especially supervillains, I promise that you haven’t.

Nat and Bucky would appreciate the moral complexity of Worm’s multitude of characters (fair warning: there are a lot of them), and Ant-Man would definitely relate to the protagonist’s powers. Many of the antagonists would have our big purple baddie Thanos wishing he could recruit them to the Black Order — and honestly, no shade to Marvel but the Slaughterhouse Nine make the Black Order look like a 90’s boy band. Worm is the single most ambitious work I have ever read, so it’s a fitting recommendation for the culmination of this ambitious franchise.  –Cassi Hall

 

Editors Note:

Cassi Hall is the Communications Specialist at NoveList, and unashamed by her love of supervillains.

Kaitlin Conner is a Readers’ Advisory Librarian at NoveList.

Lindsey Dunn is a Readers’ Advisory Librarian at NoveList.

Rebecca Honeycutt is a Readers’ Advisory Librarian at NoveList.

Kendal Spires is a Collection Development Analyst for Core Collections.

Suzanne Temple is a Metadata Librarian II at NoveList.

Books to Film: May Edition

Suprisingly slim pickings.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties by Neil Gaiman

13378509How to Talk to Girls at Parties poster.pngMovie: How to Talk to Girls at Parties
When it comes out: May 18
What the book is about: Enn is a sixteen-year-old boy who just doesn’t understand girls, while his friend Vic seems to have them all figured out. Both teenagers are in for the shock of their young lives, however, when they crash a local party only to discover that the girls there are far, far more than they appear!

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

815309On Chesil Beach (film).pngMovie: On Chesil Beach
When it comes out: May 18
What the book is about: It is July 1962. Florence is a talented musician who dreams of a career on the concert stage and of the perfect life she will create with Edward, an earnest young history student at University College of London, who unexpectedly wooed and won her heart. Newly married that morning, both virgins, Edward and Florence arrive at a hotel on the Dorset coast. At dinner in their rooms they struggle to suppress their worries about the wedding night to come. Edward, eager for rapture, frets over Florence’s response to his advances and nurses a private fear of failure, while Florence’s anxieties run deeper: she is overcome by sheer disgust at the idea of physical contact, but dreads disappointing her husband when they finally lie down together in the honeymoon suite.

 

Here’s What You Need To Know About Infinity Stones Before The New Avengers Movie

Ya Got The Stones For This? Thanos (Josh Brolin) blithely ignores Coco Chanel’s advice on accessorizing — so you knowhe’s evil — in Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War.
Marvel Studios

by Glen Weldon, April 16, 2018, first appearing on Books : NPR

Call them the Mighty Marvel Movie MacGuffins. They’re the glittery objects that drove the plots of several individual Marvel movies and that collectively shaped the direction the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe has been heading (almost) since its inception.

They are the Infinity Stones — immensely powerful gems that contain and channel elemental forces of the universe. They’re what the villains crave and what the heroes protect. They can be used to destroy or create.

Mmmmmostly that first thing.

They’ve been seeded throughout the Marvel Cinematic Universe since 2011, and now, with the release of Avengers: Infinity War on April 27, all the logistical heavy lifting of seven years’ worth of films — chasing the Stones, finding them, wielding them, handing them off to shady minor characters for safekeeping — comes to a head.

Well. To a hand, anyway.

Thanos’ hand, to be specific. Thanos’ gauntlet, if you want to get technical.

Thanos is the MCU’s biggest Big Bad, first glimpsed in a post-credit scene in 2012’s The Avengers. He is a hulking, purplish-reddish-bluish (seems to depend on the movie’s color balance) space warlord determined to reduce the population of the universe by half. If he collects all of the Infinity Stones and affixes them to a metal glove-thingy called the Infinity Gauntlet, he will be able to go about his deadly halving business, according to his daughter Gamora (Zoe Saldana) in the trailer, “with a snap of his fingers.”

(Leave aside, for the moment, how difficult it would be to snap one’s fingers in a metal gauntlet.)

(I mean it would be less of a snap and more a rasp, right?)

(Or maybe a clang? Like he was striking some terrible Xylophone of Pan-Galactic Death? Or a Wind Chime of Cosmic Annihilation?)

Anyway. That’s Thanos pictured at the top of this post. He is played in the movie by Josh Brolin and a superfluity of CGI chin dimples. And that thing he has on his left hand (so literally sinister!) is the Infinity Gauntlet.

As you can see, he is already well on his way to collecting ’em all — not quite at full, “Billie Jean”-era sparkle-glove status, but close.

Let’s review where the various Infinity Stones were the last time we saw them — and what they do.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Space Stone

AKA: The Tesseract

What It Looks Like: When first glimpsed in Captain America: The First Avenger (2011), a glowing blue cube. (The cube is just a housing that allows the glowy blue stone inside to be handled by us lowly humans.)

What It Does: Opens wormholes in space, making possible instantaneous travel between any two points in the universe. Also has undetermined (read: hazily defined) power to develop weaponry.

Transporting is what the eeeevil Red Skull did with it in Captain America: The First Avenger. It was later recovered by S.H.I.E.L.D., which lost it when Loki absconded with it in The Avengers (2012) and used it to open a wormhole above Manhattan through which an alien army attacked Earth.

Where It Is Now: It spent some time in Asgard’s armory, but at the end of Thor: Ragnarok (2017), it was stolen by Loki. (At the very end of Thor: Ragnarok, the spaceship Thor and Loki were flying was intercepted by what was very likely Thanos’ ship. So if you’re taking bets, the Space Stone is likely one of the first Infinity Stones we’ll see Thanos add to his collection.)

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Mind Stone

AKA: The Scepter

What It Looks Like: At first, in The Avengers, a scepter housing a glowy blue gem. Nowadays, a yellow gem (long story) embedded in the forehead of Vision.

What It Does: Oh, a lot of stuff. In its Scepter mode, it granted Loki zappy powers and the ability to manipulate minds, and its mere presence made the Avengers more snippy than baseline. In its current mode (as of 2015’s Avengers: Age of Ultron, it grants Vision the ability to … do lots of stuff, including phase through matter, fly, zap others with energy beams and, you know … live.)

Where It Is Now: Doing time on Vision’s forehead. But the trailers suggest this will not be a permanent condition. Look for Vision to get blurry.

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Reality Stone

AKA: The Aether

What It Looks Like: Not like a stone, for one thing. Instead, it’s a thick, red liquid that sends out tendrils that undulate in a cinematically creepy way.

What It Does: Look, it’s OK. You didn’t see Thor: The Dark World (2013). A lot of people didn’t. So you didn’t see the Reality Stone (in the form of the Aether) take over the body of Thor’s girlfriend, Jane Foster, allowing her to send out shock waves and … whatnot. As its name suggests, the Reality Stone alters reality, by converting matter to dark matter. Don’t bother asking why that’s a thing. Doesn’t matter. Lots of people didn’t see Thor: The Dark World.

Where It Is Now: For safekeeping, it was given to an ancient being who collects lots of stuff. His name, appropriately enough, is the Collector. (He is played by Benicio del Toro in Thor: The Dark World, and his character is the brother of Jeff Goldblum’s Grandmaster from Thor: Ragnarok.)

Given that not a lot of people saw Thor: The Dark World, I’d wager we won’t get a big protracted scene of Thanos hunting down and claiming the Reality Stone, and Infinity War will simply cut to the (end of the) chase.

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Power Stone

AKA: The Orb

What It Looks Like: When we first see it, at the beginning of Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), it’s encased in a silver spherical rock-thing. Later, the Orb is split open and the stone inside is grafted onto a bad guy’s space-hammer and given the awesomely ridiculous name of Cosmi-Rod. Once the bad guy is defeated through the power of dance, the Stone is returned to another Orb-casing.

What It Does: Grants … power? Look, I know, the specific abilities of the various stones seem kind of frustratingly all over the place, but this one’s legit. It makes its wielder more powerful — better, stronger, more zappy. You know: energy blasts and energy tornadoes and energy waves and energy bars. (No, OK, not that last one.)

Where It Is Now: Benicio del Toro’s Collector character nearly added it to his collection, but it sent out a massive energy blast, as is its zappy wont, that destroyed most of his menagerie. It ended up in hands of the Nova Corps — basically the Marvel Universe’s resident space-cops, run by Glenn Close in a complicated wig — and there it will stay, until it won’t.

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Time Stone

AKA: The Eye of Agamotto

What It Looks Like: First (and only) seen in Doctor Strange (2016), it’s a glowy green gem housed inside an amulet embossed with an eye.

What It Does: Finally, some specificity! Some truth in advertising! The Time Stone allows its wielder to control time — to speed it up, slow it down, reverse it or create time loops. See, there, Marvel? Simple. Precise. Clean.

Where It Is Now: Hanging around Doctor Stephen Strange’s neck, right under his dumb goatee.

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Soul Stone

AKA: ?

What It Looks Like: Again, ? It has yet to turn up in a Marvel movie, at least by that name. It’s most likely an orange gem, the largest of them all, which fits on the back of the gauntlet — not, as the others do, on the fingers.

What It Does: In the comics, it grants its owner the ability to do lots of mystical things — trap souls in an artificial existence, see into a person’s soul, etc. It’s not known how closely the film will adhere to this.

But given the fact that so much of the Infinity War trailer is set in and around Wakanda — and the fact that the “heart-shaped flower” seen in Black Panther grants the ability to commune with the dead — many have speculated that the Soul Stone will turn out to have something to do with vibranium.

Where It Is Now: Your guess is as good as any. Unless you guess, “in Wakanda,” in which case it’s slightly better than most, probably.

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Sharon Stone

AKA: Catherine Tramell, Ginger McKenna, Iris Burton

What It Looks Like: A human woman.

What It Does: Wears the Gap to the Oscars, famously. And nowadays? Rocks the hell out of a Disaster Artist cameo and gives a great interview in a sweater to which attention must be paid.

Where It Is Now: Not getting the work it deserves, HOLLYWOOD.

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Slyandthefamily Stone

AKA: Sly Stone, Freddie Stone, Rose Stone, Cynthia Robinson, Greg Errico, Jerry Martini, Larry Graham.

What It Looks Like: Deeply groovy.

What It Does: Effortlessly fuse rock, soul, funk and psychedelia into chart-topping, socially conscious pop anthems.

Where It Is Now: On the set list of every wedding DJ at or slightly after 10:30 p.m.

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Coldcreamery Stone

AKA: “That place your Aunt Janice likes? With the slab? What’s it called?”

What It Looks Like: An ice cream store, duh.

What It Does: Grants its wielder one unusually muscular forearm.

Where It Is Now: 1,100 locations in the U.S. and abroad.

Genre Friday – WESTERNS

Image result for western genre

The Western genre is uniquely American (more-or-less – Australian and Eurowesterns [see below], and spaghetti western films [many oddly inspired by Japanese samurai films] create a few exceptions to this rule). The genre’s main feature is its setting, the untamed western half of the United States during the 1800s (and occasionally stretching into the late 1700s or early 1900s), which makes sense as it got its start in the “penny dreadfuls” and “dime novels” of the 19th century. These cheap books were wildly popular and helped spread the mythic image of the old west with stories about the mountain men, outlaws, settlers, and lawmen who were taming the wild western frontier. Western novels as we know them today began appearing in the early 20th century, popularized by well known authors like Zane Grey and later, in the mid 20th century, by authors like Louis L’Amour. Maybe due to the timing of it, as the Western novel was becoming popular as motion pictures came into their own, but the Western genre is as well known for its movies (and movie stars) and TV shows as it is for its books (maybe better known). This is why you’ll notice in the list of Western subgenres below that more than a few of the examples given are film titles.

Sadly, the genre peaked around the early 1960s and has been undergoing a long, slow decline ever since. Most of the best movies are old, and a lot of the new ones are remakes, and many of the most iconic Western novels (and their authors) are several decades past their prime. Still, as long as there is an audience for them, Westerns and their rugged heroes will continue to prevail before stoically riding off into the sunset.

Western Subgenres

You can be fairly certain that there will be six shooters and horses, but aside from that Westerns can vary quite a bit. Below is a list of many of the subgenres associated with tales of the wild west.

1063180Australian westerns are a rare exception to the ‘time and place’ bounds of the genre, moving from the western US to the untamed Australian outback. Sometimes, the protagonist is an American that is no longer satisfied with the rapidly-filling western United States, and instead settles in Australia’s vast outback. Sometimes the story centers around European or Australian outlaws and their western-like adventures and escapades. Ned Kelly, the fictional account of a real Australian outlaw is a good example.

Black Cowboy (Buffalo Soldier): These westerns feature a protagonist of color. Gerald Haslam’s story Rider is a fine example. These stories sometimes depict members or veterans of the US Army’s 9th and 10th Cavalry (aka Buffalo Soldiers), African-American soldiers that gained fame for their actions in the west. Z.Z. Packer’s novel The Thousands is a good example of this subgenre.

Bounty Hunter tales center upon these morally ambiguous characters. Peter Brandvold’s novel Bounty Hunter Lou Prophet is a clear example. Cormac McCarthy’s novel Blood Meridian follows a band of bloodthirsty killers after the money offered for killing Native Americans.

Cattle Drive westerns are set amidst this definitive frontier activity and, along with gunslingers and wagon trains, is among the most well known and frequently depicted western subgenre. Often the young protagonist makes long strides toward adulthood during these grueling journeys. Larry McMurtry’s novel Lonesome Dove and its sequels are famous examples. Clay Fisher’s novel The Tall Men is another.

2881203Civil War westerns are defined by the conflict that gives the subgenre its name – pitched battles having been fought as far west as New Mexico. Stories can be set during or after the war as former soldiers carried Blue/Gray antagonisms throughout the frontier in the years following the official end of the fighting. Johnny D. Boggs’ novel Camp Ford is a comprehensive example. Howard Hawk’s 1970 film Rio Lobo places John Wayne in a similar situation.

463124Cowpunk is a subgenre that derives its name (and irreverant tone) from science fiction’s ‘cyberpunk.’ It can also, but does not have to, overlap with the steampunk subgenre of sci-fi to varying degrees. These tales depict all sorts of bizarre happenings on the remote frontier. Elisabeth Scarborough’s novel The Drastic Dragon of Draco Texas mixes ethnic mythology with comedy and horror.

Doctor and Preacher is a subgenre with two main types of protagonists. I’ll give you two guesses… Well done.

The common thread between the two character types are that such lead characters are committed to peace and healing (or know they should be) despite frequently finding themselves surrounded by violent situations and people. TV’s fictional Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman is a well-known example. Robert B. Parker’s novel Preacher is a more recent one.

Winnetou I: Kepala Suku ApacheEurowestern tales come, as the term implies, from Europe. Karl May’s German-language novels, starting in 1892 with his Winnetou I, brought the excitement and allure of the rugged frontier across the Atlantic. Sergio Leone’s classic 1966 ‘spaghetti western’ films, like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly with Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef in the white and black hats, could also be considered part of this genre. Traditional examples of this subgenre are often more gritty; in a an emotional and violent (and even dusty) sense, than its American cousins, which could depict a more romanticized version of the Old West.

257837Gunfighter tales are an iconic western subgenre. In reality, two men dueling each other on the dusty main street of an old west town almost never happened , yet that image is probably what people most often picture when thinking of westerns and it is essential the plot of these stories. Often a ‘white hat’ protagonist reluctantly agrees to go up against a cruel ‘black hat’ villain on behalf of oppressed common folks. Jack Schaefer’s 1949 novel Shane is a classic example. Fred Zinnemann’s 1952 film High Noon casts Gary Cooper in the lead role.

2917585Humorous or Parody is self-explanatory. Mel Brook’s 1974 film Blazing Saddles towers over this subgenre. Gene Kelly’s 1970 film The Cheyenne Social Club is another example and Ellen Recknor’s novel Prophet Annie is full of wry humor.

Indian Wars dominate the subgenre of the same name. They are often historically accurate in the details, but can also reflect the time and worldview (and thus, bias) of the author. James Fenimore Cooper’s 1826 novel The Last of the Mohicans remains a classic. Douglas C. Jones’s novel The Court Martial of George Armstrong Custer vividly depicts a “what if?” cultural clash, asking ‘was General Custer a hero or a villain?’ Many older American films depict the Indians as ruthless savages to be swept aside. In Arthur Penn’s 1970 film Little Big Man the natives are wise and noble and white Americans cruel interlopers. Kevin Costner’s 1990 film Dances With Wolves portrays a more realistic mixed bag.

235292Land Rush stories usually focus on Oklahoma, where vast tracts of land were suddenly opened to homesteading — whether the resident Native Americans liked it or not. Al and Joanna Lacy’s novel The Land of Promise is one example. Ron Howard’s 1992 film Far and Away has a dramatic portrayal.

4554887Lawmen (Texas Rangers): This subgenre centers around the honest lawmen (especially Texas Rangers) who struggled to bring order and justice to the wild frontier. Often the protagonist is, or is based upon, an actual person. Jack Cumming’s novel The Last Lawmen is a realistic example.

1063298Mexican Wars (Texan Independence): Stories in this subgenre include the decisive geopolitical events of 1845-48. Marion G. Otto’s novel Hugh Harrington is a good example. Many Texan tales feature the siege of the Alamo, like Stephen Harrigan’s novel The Gates of the Alamo. Mexican authors who write in this subgenre often depict the secession of Texas, and the US invasion of Veracruz and Mexico City — but with heroes and villains reversed.

48119Modern Indians is a western subgenre that is set in the present day with a protagonist must bridge a venerable Native American heritage with modern American culture and technology. Tony Hillerman’s novel Coyote Waits is perhaps the best known example. Hillerman’s books are often listed with the ‘mystery’ genre, as they feature the Navajo tribal police. To his credit, they’re immensely popular in Navajo country.

24598788Mormon tales center upon the settlement of Utah in the 1840s and 50s, under the leadership of Brigham Young. Marilyn Brown’s novel The Wine-Dark Sea of Grass is an unstinting depiction and From Everlasting to Everlasting, by Sophie Freeman, mirrors real-life experiences. Many of these novels are published by imprints associated with the LDS church.

3680174Outlaw westerns focus on the ‘black hats,’ the colorful villains of that era cast as anti-heroes. The Dalton Brothers, Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and many others became legends in their own time. Eugene Manlove Rhodes’ 1927 novel Paso por Aqui (later reprinted as Four Faces West) depicts an unusual robber hunted by the famous marshal Pat Garrett.

1208794Prairie Settlement tales are not quite standard ‘westerns,’ but they do fall within the time-and-place bounds of the genre. They depict the taming of the vast flat plains of the midwest, during the 1800s. Ole Rolvaag’s classic novel Giants in the Earth depicts a Norwegian family enduring bitter winters and maddening loneliness, as civilization slowly follows them west. While intended for children, Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House” series is enjoyed by all ages.

830742Prospecting (Gold Rush): This subgenre focuses on the quest for sudden riches, whether as a comfortable silver mine owner or a hardscrabble gold panner. In the 1860s, Bret Harte and Mark Twain immortalized these characters even as the California gold rush was in full swing. Jack London extended the ‘western’ genre northward, with realistic accounts of the 1896 gold rush into Alaska and the Yukon Territory, most famously in his novel The Call of the Wild.

10090301Quest westerns involve a protagonist on a mission, set against a harsh untamed frontier and relentless rivals and/or enemies. Cameron Judd’s novel The Quest of Brady Kenton is an oft-cited example of this subgenre. Elmer Kelton’s Cloudy in the West is another.

Railroad stories center upon a titanic project: the bridging of the east and west coasts by the Central Pacific and Union Pacific lines. Rugged geography, indentured Chinese workers, and international scandals add depth to this milieu. John Ford’s 1924 film The Iron Horse remains a classic.

169751Range Wars (Sheepmen): These stories center upon a peculiar western rivalry, as ranchers trying to claim the best grazing land came into conflict with homesteading farmers (sometimes sheep ranchers) who were fencing off said grazing land. Owen Wister’s classic 1902 novel The Virginian, later filmed at least twice, depicts Wyoming’s fratricidal Johnson County War.

A few subgenre tales focus on shepherds, many of them Basque immigrants, and the wool merchants who owned the flocks. Zane Grey’s 1922 novel To the Last Man depicts a cattlemen vs. sheepmen feud (based upon real Arizona history) so vicious its title is a literal description.

10035073Revenge westerns are a relatively dark subgenre. A determined protagonist, often a young survivor of some cruel massacre, goes after the perpetrators. In the Western setting, witnesses to crimes were few, and law enforcement scarce (and sometimes corrupt), leading to such harsh individual actions. Charles Portis’s 1969 novel True Grit, soon filmed by Henry Hathaway (also remade by the Coen brothers), follows a determined young woman on such a mission.

3467451Romance is an overlapping subgenre, where the Romance and Western genres meet, which features the elements of Romance but in the ‘western’ novel setting. A.H. Holt’s Silver Creek and Morgan J. Blake’s Redemption are two such novels.

Town-tamer westerns are well described by their name. A lone gunman, or sometimes a group of friends, take on the corrupt and oppressive leaders or marauding bandits that are terrorizing an isolated town. Frank Gruber’s story “Town Tamer,” filmed by Lesley Selander, is a clear example. Lawrence Kasdan’s 1985 movie Silverado is a great depiction. John Sturges’ 1960 film The Magnificent Seven extends this subgenre into rural Mexico.

822935Most Trapper or Mountain Man tales are set earlier than other western subgenres, when Native Americans still dominated the land and civilization was still a long way away in the “East.” Often the rugged protagonist is the only white man for hundreds of miles around, and he’ll find a native bride. Louis L’Amour’s novel To the Far Blue Mountains depicts the earliest English settlement of the Appalachians, in the 1500s. A.B. Guthrie’s novel The Big Sky crosses the continent, and James Michener’s sprawling Centennial is another example.

Wagon Train westerns are a quintessential subgenre. The Oregon Trail was the interstate highway of its era, with lumbering Conestoga wagons, and hardships that were often extreme. Zane Grey’s 1936 novel The Lost Wagon Train is a classic example. George Stewart’s episodic novel Sheep Rock follows waves of settlers through a remote Nevada desert.

The WindWomen protagonists lead this subgenre. Some tales idealize their courage and triumphs, as with the real-life Annie Oakley. Opposite this, Dorothy Scarborough’s 1925 novel The Wind is a harsh depiction of a young woman’s life in frontier west Texas – so harsh that the leaders of Texas at the time protested.

Loved A Quiet Place? Here’s What To Read Next

Emily Blunt and Millicent Simmonds in A Quiet Place (2018). Photo Credit: Jonny Cournoyer © 2017 Paramount Pictures

Being alone in the dark, unable to make a sound, unseen creatures waiting to attack – these are some of humanity’s most primal fears, fears that lurk deep within us all. These sorts of fears, and the anxieties they pry from us, have long been fertile ground for horror and thrillers across all mediums. “A Quiet Place” is set to arrive in theaters on April 6th, telling the story of a family surviving in total silence out of fear of unseen creatures who hunt purely by sound, so naturally these sorts of deep-down fears are firmly on our minds. While there’s undoubtedly something special in catching a great horror film on the big screen in a dark theater, nothing quite compares to the chill that comes from curling up with a terrifying read. Fortunately, there are an abundance of frightening and unnerving reads to scratch this particular itch – silently, of course.

 

The cover of the book Bird BoxBird Box

Josh Malerman

Josh Malerman’s debut novel is an unrelenting excursion into suspense and tension. Set in apocalyptic near-future, Malerman imagines a world beset by mysterious creatures who drive anyone who catches even a glimpse of them into a volatile and deadly mania. Malorie and her young children, who were born after the creatures appeared and have been trained to navigate the world under blindfolds, set off on journey downriver to what they hope is a safe haven. But something is stalking their every move.

And if this sounds like your cup of tea, good news – a Netflix adaptation of Bird Box starring Sandra Bullock is due out later this year.

 

The cover of the book BlindnessBlindness

José Saramago

Blindness is among José Saramago’s finest novels and was cited by the Nobel Committee when Saramago won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1998. The novel follow seven strangers stuck in an epidemic of blindness. As the city around them descends into chaos and becomes more and more dangerous, a woman who has miraculously retained her sight attempts to lead the group to safety and keep them alive. It is a haunting parable of loss and man’s capacity for violence and degradation.

 

The cover of the book The RoadThe Road

Cormac Mccarthy

Cormac McCarthy took home a Pulitzer Prize for The Road, which centers on an unnamed father and son making their way across a an America devastated by an unexplained apocalyptic event. Their bleak and harrowing journey is both shockingly violent and unexpectedly hopeful. It is an unflinching meditation on man’s capacity for brutality as well powerful love between a parent and child.

 

The cover of the book The SilenceThe Silence

Tim Lebbon

They are blind and hunt purely by sound, twisted creatures that emerge from an underground cave system to feed, tracking their prey by the slightest sound. A young girl and her family watch the news in horror as the creatures lay waste to mainland Europe. When the creatures begin to appear in the UK, the girl – who has been deaf for most of her life – set out for a safe haven, hoping silence will shield them from the terrifying creatures.

 

The cover of the book The FiremanThe Fireman

Joe Hill

Beginning in the early days of a devastating global pandemic, The Fireman centers around the journey of a nurse named Harper Grayson. A deadly spore causes its victims to break out in beautiful gold markings and eventually spontaneously combust. When Harper spots the gold markings on her arms, her only goal is to survive long enough to give birth to her child, but as she struggles for survival she soon discovers there is far more to the outbreak than she ever could have imagined – and that perhaps it isn’t the death sentence she thought it was.

 

The cover of the book The TroopThe Troop

Nick Cutter

It’s Lord of the Flies meets an apocalyptic contagion! I’m not really sure I need to say more than that, but here goes: Nick Cutter’s novel centers on a scout troop’s annual weekend camping trip to an island in the Canadian wilderness. What begins as a reliably fun experience quickly deteriorates into an exercise in survival and terror when an emaciated, pale, and disturbingly hungry stranger wanders into the group’s camp.

 

The cover of the book HexHex

Thomas Olde Heuvelt

Black Spring is a seemingly picturesque community harboring one unsettling secret – the streets are haunted by seventeenth century woman whose eyes and month are sewn shut. Known as the Black Spring Witch, she enters homes at will and menaces townsfolk as they sleep in their beds. The town elders have kept the town effectively quarantined to keep their secret and keep the curse from spreading, but when a group of teenagers break the long-established traditions, the town descends into chaos and darkness.

 

The cover of the book The Beast of BarcroftThe Beast of Barcroft

Bill Schweigart

Barcroft is like any other well-to-do commuter suburb, except for one major difference – a ferocious creature is stalking the community. Ben McKelvie bought a house in Barcroft with his fiancée before everything fell apart. Now he’s square in the sights of the otherworldly creature, and he needs help. Now.

 

The cover of the book Wytches Vol. 1Wytches Vol. 1

Scott Snyder & Jock

The Rooks moved to the remote community of Litchfield, NH, hoping to find relief and a safe haven from their family’s recent traumas. Unfortunately, Litchfield harbors a dark secret stretching back generations. An ancient and hungry power lurks in the forest just beyond the town, and it’s watching the Rooks.

 

The cover of the book WatchersWatchers

Dean Koontz

On a hike through the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains, Travis Cornell runs across a disheveled golden retriever. Soon he and the remarkably intelligent dog are on a run for their lives from an unseen and terrifying creature intent on destroying the dog and anyone who gets in its way.