Learn Your Library Resources: Library Newsletters

Newsletter

Our monthly newsletter to keeps you informed about other upcoming library programs and events! Click here to sign up!

 

 

Book Happenings

Sign up for our newest e-newsletter to get highlighted new releases, featured recommendations, and more book news right in your inbox! Click here to sign up!

 

LIBRARY CLOSING DUE TO FRIGID WINTER TEMPERATURES!

In anticipation of the potentially all-time record low temperatures coming mid-week the library will be closing early at 5:00pm on Tuesday, January 29 and will be closed entirely on Wednesday, January 30.

We will (probably) return to normal business hours on Thursday, January 31 (although it might be a good idea to call and confirm we’re here if you are unsure before you make the trip).

We apologize for any inconvenience this causes.

 

314 Rare Books Valued at Over $5 Million Stolen from the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Suspects but No Answers in Rare Book Theft at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Library

by Bob WarburtonApril 3, 2018, first appearing in Library Journal

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Via Wikimedia Commons

Investigators from the Allegheny County, PA, District Attorney’s Office continue to remain silent on the theft of 314 rare books, folios, maps, and other items from the rare materials room at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh(CLP), although one official there confirmed that “suspect(s) have been identified.”

The thefts, discovered during an insurance appraisal last spring, were first made public in March. CLP released a full list of the missing items. No arrests have been reported, although law enforcement officials have said very little so far about the case. There is no word as to whether any of the materials have been recovered.

Detectives asked the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) to circulate the list of missing treasures among its members so they could alert authorities in Pittsburgh if any items are spotted in shops, Susan Benne, the organization’s executive director, said. The rare books in particular, she told LJ, would carry CLP markings on the spine or other labels, making them fairly easy to spot if a seller tried to interest a rare bookstore or dealer in buying these items.

On the list of stolen items are ten volumes published before the year 1500 and many more from the 17th century. There is a first edition of Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica by Isaac Newton, published in 1687, as well as a 1776 first edition of Adam Smith’s An Inquiry into the Nature Causes of the Wealth of Nations.

Other notable items include a volume of Homer from 1561, an 1898 memoir from suffragette Elizabeth Cady Stanton called Eighty Years or More (1815–1897), a 1908 letter signed by William Jennings Bryan, and a lesson book from 1864 Richmond, VA, called The Confederate Reader: Containing Selections in Prose and Poetry as Reading Exercises for Children in the Schools and Families of the Confederate States.

“This is a great loss to the Pittsburgh community,” Suzanne Thinnes, CLP’s manager for communications, said in a widely released statement that has been the library’s lone public comment on the matter. “Trust is a very important component of what we do on a daily basis and we take very seriously the security of all collections.”

Thinnes added, “As of now, suspect(s) have been identified and additional details will be shared by the District Attorney’s office at a later date.”

Asked about the police investigation, Mike Manko, the chief spokesman for the Allegheny County District Attorney’s Office, said only, “I wouldn’t have any comment on that.”

There remained no word as to when law enforcement officials would go public with more information on the CLP theft. Thinnes’s statement said, “We look forward to sharing our story once legal proceedings are complete.”

Read on…

CELEBRATE NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK, 2018!

National Library Week 2018 graphic, featuring Misty Copeland

by jfalcon

Every day, libraries of all types prove that they are powerful agents of community change. No longer just places for books, libraries now offer a smorgasbord of free digitally-based programs and services, including 3-D printing, ebooks, digital recording studios and technology training.

National Library Week will be observed April 8-14, 2018 with the theme, “Libraries Lead.”

First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians and to promote library use and support. All types of libraries – school, public, academic and special – participate.

The National Library Week 2018 celebration will mark the 60th anniversary of the first event, sponsored in 1958.

In the mid-1950s, research showed that Americans were spending less on books and more on radios, televisions and musical instruments. Concerned that Americans were reading less, the ALA and the American Book Publishers formed a nonprofit citizens organization called the National Book Committee in 1954. The committee’s goals were ambitious.  They ranged from “encouraging people to read in their increasing leisure time” to “improving incomes and health” and “developing strong and happy family life.”

Wake up and Read National Library Week poster

In 1957, the committee developed a plan for National Library Week based on the idea that once people were motivated to read, they would support and use libraries. With the cooperation of ALA and with help from the Advertising Council, the first National Library Week was observed in 1958 with the theme “Wake Up and Read!”

Celebrations during National Library Week include: National Library Workers Day, celebrated the Tuesday of National Library Week (April 10, 2018), a day for library staff, users, administrators and Friends groups to recognize the valuable contributions made by all library workers; National Bookmobile Day, celebrated the Wednesday of National Library Week (April 11, 2018), a day to recognize the contributions of our nation’s bookmobiles and the dedicated professionals who make quality bookmobile outreach possible in their communities, and Take Action for Libraries Day, a national library advocacy effort observed for the first time in 2017 in response to proposed cuts to federal funds for libraries.

On Monday, April 9, the 2018 State of America’s Libraries Report will be released.  The report includes the much anticipated list of Top Ten Most Challenged Books of the previous year, compiled by the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom.

Misty Copeland serves as 2018 National Library Week Honorary Chair.

In August 2015, Copeland was promoted to principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre, making her the first African American woman to ever be promoted to the position in the company’s 75-year history.

Copeland is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir “Life in Motion,” and her 2014 picture book “Firebird” won the Coretta Scott King Book Illustrator Award in 2015. Her new book, “Ballerina Body,” an instant New York Times Bestseller, published in March 2017.

She has worked with many charitable organizations and is dedicated to giving of her time to work with and mentor young girls and boys. She was named National Youth of the Year Ambassador for the Boys & Girls Clubs of America in June 2013. In 2014, President Obama appointed Copeland to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition.  And in 2015, she traveled to Rwanda with MindLeaps to help launch its girls program and to establish The Misty Copeland Scholarship.

There are several ways to celebrate National Library Week:

1. Visit your library.

Head to your public, school or academic library during National Library Week to see what’s new and take part in the celebration.  Libraries across the country are participating.

2. Show your support for libraries on social media.

Follow I Love Libraries on Facebook and Twitter and the hashtags #NationalLibraryWeek and #LibrariesTransform to join the celebration on social media.

Post National Library Week graphics to your social media channels.

Where did the library lead you? Tell us during National Library Week.

National Library Week is the perfect opportunity to tell the world why you value libraries. This year, in keeping with the Libraries Lead theme, we’re asking you tell us how the library led you to something of value in your life.

Library lovers can post to Twitter, Instagram, or on the I Love Libraries Facebook page during National Library Week for a chance to win. Entries can be a picture or text.  Creativity is encouraged. Just be sure to they include the hashtags #LibrariesLead and #NationalLibraryWeek for a chance to win.

One randomly selected winner will receive a $100 gift card and a copy of “Firebird,” the Coretta Scott King Award-winning book by Misty Copeland, our National Library Week Honorary Chair.

Join in the fun. The promotion begins Sunday, April 8 at noon CT and ends Saturday, April 14 at noon CT.  Check out the National Library Week page for details and more ways to celebrate.

In a Virtual World

How school, academic, and public libraries are testing virtual reality in their communities

Virtual Reality

 March 1, 2018, first appearing in American Libraries Magazine

In the past several years, virtual reality (VR) technology has finally begun to fulfill what had long been promised. Traditional VR, which creates environments that allow people to be “present” in an alternative environment, has been advanced by offerings from Oculus, Sony, Google, and Samsung. At the same time, products like Google’s Cardboard have led the growth of 360-degree video that captures an entire scene in which the viewer can look up, down, and around. Instead of just games and entertainment, VR content is exploding with news, information, and educational content.

Throughout this period of growth and expansion, libraries and librarians have once again demonstrated their adaptability to new information formats and user needs with moves that reflect the various directions VR has moved. Whether it is classroom use of Google Expeditions, new educational spaces and lending programs on academic campuses, or a demonstrated commitment to equitable access to this new technology in public libraries, librarians have taken on VR as a new way to engage their users.

In the months and years ahead, library professionals will likely need to consider how VR and 360-degree video fit into their commitments to acquire and organize information, make the informational content of this technology available for reference and citation, and empower users to be both media consumers and creators. For now, … libraries and librarians are showing how they can innovate with this latest trend in media and information.

Read on…

____________________________________________________________________________________________

To experience virtual reality at the Moline Public Library, stop by the second floor where we have a virtual tour of the new I74 river bridge!

Renew Your Items Up to 3 Times in 2018!

Happy New Year!

In 2018, most items you check at can be renewed up to three times.  Renewals can be done via your online account, by visiting the Circulation Desk, or by calling 1-888-542-7259.

3Some items will not be eligible for renewal, such as items with waiting lists, equipment, passes to local attractions, and new materials.  Entertainment DVDs and Video Games may only be renewed in person with the $1 rental fee.   For more information about renewals, ask at the Circulation Desk or call 309-524-2450.

So go ahead, check out War and Peace or the 28 disc audiobook version of Outlander.  You’ve got time!