Ancestry.com Library Edition

October Ancestry Class

Trace your family history through the in-library online database, Ancestry Library Edition. The popular database includes over 10 billion genealogical records, the world’s largest online family history resource.

Bob Conklin, Adult Services Librarian, discusses and demonstrates basic features of the database.  Collections within the database include birth, marriage, and death records, military records, newspapers, and immigration records, and much more.

Seating is limited and registration is required in person at the 2nd floor Information Desk or by phone at 309-524-2470.

 

Cowboy Courage!

cowboy courage program

Black Hawk College, Professor Emeritus, Bill Hampes, will share from his book, Cowboy Courage:  Westerns and the Portrayal of Bravery.

Film and television Westerns are associated with physical bravery. Productions from the Golden Age” of Westerns from the 1940s to the early 1960s – demonstrate moral bravery (the willingness to do the right thing even when met with others’ disapproval) and psychological bravery (the ability to overcome one’s fear and inner conflict to bring out the best in oneself and others).

Through a close examination of Westerns displaying all three types of bravery, the author shows us how courage can lead to, and even enrich, other virtues like redemption, authenticity, love, friendship, allegiance to one’s community, and justice.

Best Sellers Update: October

Autumn is here. Cooler temperatures and rainy afternoons are soon to follow, but don’t fret! It’s just the beginning of reading season!

Here’s some ideas for what to read from the best sellers list.

New York Times: Combined Print & E-Book Best Sellers

  1. THE WATER DANCER by Ta-Nehisi Coates (NEW)

43982054Young Hiram Walker was born into bondage. When his mother was sold away, Hiram was robbed of all memory of her—but was gifted with a mysterious power. Years later, when Hiram almost drowns in a river, that same power saves his life. This brush with death births an urgency in Hiram and a daring scheme: to escape from the only home he’s ever known. So begins an unexpected journey that takes Hiram from the corrupt grandeur of Virginia’s proud plantations to desperate guerrilla cells in the wilderness, from the coffin of the deep South to dangerously utopic movements in the North. Even as he’s enlisted in the underground war between slavers and the enslaved, Hiram’s resolve to rescue the family he left behind endures.

  1. VINCE FLYNN: LETHAL AGENT by Kyle Mills (NEW)
  2. THE INSTITUTE by Stephen
  3. THE DUTCH HOUSE by Ann Patchett (NEW)
  4. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia
  5. THE TESTAMENTS by Margaret Atwood
  6. IMMORTAL BORN by Lynsay Sands (NEW)
  7. ARCHANGEL’S WAR by Nalini Singh (NEW)
  8. THE GOLDFINCH by Donna Tartt
  9. THE HANDMAID’S TALE by Margaret Atwood
  10. THE GREAT ALONE by Kristin Hannah
  11. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  12. SINS OF THE FATHERS by J.A. Jance (NEW)
  13. THE GIRL WHO LIVED TWICE by David Lagercrantz
  14. IT by Stephen King

AUTUMN IS HERE! You know what that means…

BANNED BOOKS WEEK 2019!

If you are new to Banned Books Week, it is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read whatever you want, the freedom to encounter, express and discuss new or different ideas, even (maybe even especially) ideas that some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

Banned Books 2019

Usually held during the last week of September, Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types to recognize current and historical attempts to censor books in libraries and schools.

Stand up for your rights and read a banned or challenged book today!

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Genre Friday – Bumbling Detective Mysteries

They can’t all be Sherlock Holmes.

Peter Sellers as Inspector Jacques Clouseau (Photo: Shout! Factory & MGM)

Peter Sellers as Inspector Jacques Clouseau, The Pink Panther (Photo: MGM)

Looking for a little slapstick with your sleuthing? Enjoy mysteries where the gumshoe is as clueless (if not more so) as the reader? Do you love when everything works out despite the bizarre twists and turns that life throws at your favorite hapless protagonist?

Bumbling Detective Mysteries might be your thing then.

Incompetent, oblivious or just inexperienced, the would-be crime solvers in this mystery sub-genre are normally in way over their heads, whether they know it or not. Many of the most famous examples come from film or TV, ranging from Inspector Clouseau (above) to Inspector Gadget (whose drop brim trilby and trench coat were not a coincidence), but there are plenty of examples in print as well.

With a frequently light and almost always humorous feel, many of these stories could be said to overlap with the Cozy Mystery sub-genre, but they don’t have to as a rule. All that is required is a sleuth that muddles through the danger and confusion and somehow arrives at the end with a solution without ever really knowing how they arrived there, even if they pretend to have had it all under control from the beginning.

Here is a quick list of books for those looking for a bit more Clouseau than Holmes in their next read.

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You liked __________, you’ll love __________!

Did you like Lilac Girls, an incredible story of love, redemption, and terrible secrets that were hidden since WWII?

If so, we’ve got some recommendations for you to try.

Lilac Girls Shelf End Ditto NU

TIPS FOR GETTING THE BEST BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS FROM YOUR LIBRARIAN

“You’re a librarian? You must love to read!”

“You’re a librarian? You must know a lot about books!”

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard declarations like these when people find out I’m a public librarian…

With this widespread librarians-love-to-read assumption, I was surprised by how few library patrons asked me or my co-workers for recommendations when I first started working in a public library. Upon reflection, however, I realize that asking a librarian for a book recommendation might be uncomfortable or intimidating. I’m a stranger, I’m behind a big imposing desk…why would anyone want to talk to me about what they should read next?

If you’re going to take the plunge and ask a librarian for title suggestions, click here for some tips to get the best out of the interaction from Book Riot.

 

Or you could try out Moline Public Library’s very own personalized book recommendation service, Library Concierge!