Murder on the Orient Express

Do you enjoy intelligent murder mysteries, trains, movies made from books about murder on trains, and/or anything by Agatha Christie? If so, here are some other things you might be interested in.

Murder on the Orient Express Shelf End Ditto NU

Did you know?

We are everywhere!

By “We” I mean public libraries, of course.

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According to the American Library Association there are 16,568 public libraries (including branch locations) in the United States!

That’s more libraries than there are Starbucks! Than there are McDonald’s! More than all the KFCs, Taco Bells and Walmarts put together! 

According to the Institute of Museum and Library Services, those 16,568 libraries serve over 297 million people, over 96% of the population! There are 3 libraries and 5.8 library outlets (branches, bookmobiles, etc.) for every 100,000 people.

It turns out we are a big part of life for a huge number of Americans. We’re just kind of quiet about it. Self-promotion is difficult when you have been quietly doing your job of providing free access to books, information, technology, services and educational, cultural and entertainment programming for the last couple of hundred years. We are working on it, but it is slow going.

The good news is that you can help. If you are one of those 297 million that we serve, and odds are good that your are, just keep us in mind. Remember us the next time you’re in line at Starbucks, and maybe make a note to let somebody know about how great the local library is.

It doesn’t matter where your are, there should be one nearby.

Rules of the Road Review Class at the Library

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Nancy Johnson, associated with AARP and the Office of the Illinois Secretary of State will present a free, 90-minute Illinois Rules of the Road class for seniors.  Registration is required.

Learn Your Library Resources – Moline Dispatch Archives

Did you know that the Moline Public Library has over 100 years of the Moline Dispatch on microfilm?!

Or that a large portion of that microfilm collection has also been digitized and is available in a text-searchable database online?!

The searchable, digital archives of the Moline Dispatch (and its predecessors) are available to anyone from anywhere. The collection, which includes papers from 1850-1859 and 1870-1969, can be found on Online Resources page under the Fing It tab on the Moline Public Library website. Or you can just click this link.
Dispatch Capture

Need to look for a year that hasn’t been digitized yet (or just dislike computers)? No worries. You can always still come into the library and search the microfilm directly on the public microfilm machines. Staff are always happy to get you started and to help with printing or saving what you find.

The British are coming!

Attention anglophiles, admirers of British accents and fans of good television! BBC shows are now available through hoopla!

BBC Hoopla

© 2019 hoopla Digital

If you don’t know about hoopla yet, click here to find out about hoopla and our other digital resources.

If you know about it but haven’t downloaded the app and checked it out you can click here to get an idea of what you’re missing.

It was a bright, cold day in April and the clocks were striking thirteen.

Maybe your day wasn’t bright (it’s been raining here for hours), but it was probably colder than you would’ve liked.

Either way, something about today put me in mind of the opening line from George Orwell’s classic 1984. Something ever so mildly bleak in the air. I’m sure it is a passing thing and that spring will arrive in full force soon, but still…

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I guess, what I am trying to say is that it is a great day to go some place quiet and comfortable with lots of reading material, and maybe an attached cafe where you can get a sandwich and a cup of coffee, and hold up for hours reading. Maybe learning about any other services that such a magical place could provide or, at the very least, assembling a small stack of books that I would then see if I could borrow.

Sigh.

If only such a wonderful place existed. *wink*

 

 

Best Sellers: April Update

New York Times Best Sellers: Combined Print & E-Book Fiction

  1. WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens

36809135For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

  1. RUN AWAY by Harlan Coben (NEW)
  2. CELTIC EMPIRE by Clive Cussler and Dirk Cussler (NEW)
  3. THE FIRST LADY by James Patterson and Brendan DuBois (NEW)
  4. THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW by A.J. Finn
  5. THE TATTOOIST OF AUSCHWITZ by Heather Morris
  6. WOLF PACK by C.J. Box
  7. THE LOST GIRLS OF PARIS by Pam Jenoff
  8. CEMETERY ROAD by Greg Iles
  9. THE SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides
  10. DAISY JONES & THE SIX by Taylor Jenkins Reid
  11. ELEANOR OLIPHANT IS COMPLETELY FINE by Gail Honeyman
  12. THE FALLEN by David Baldacci
  13. SILENT NIGHT by Danielle Steel
  14. THE HUNTRESS by Kate Quinn