8 In 10 Adults Still See Libraries as Sources of Credible Info

Card Cat

Photo by Sanwal Deen on Unsplash

With the terms of what constitutes “news” or even “facts” ever more in question, most Americans are comfortable depending on public libraries to help guide them toward reliable sources. A new study cited by the Pew Research Center reports that at least seventy-eight percent of adults believe their local library can steer them toward information that is “trustworthy and reliable.” In fact, the public’s growing fear of being bamboozled by “fake news” may actually be working in our libraries’ favor, as “about six-in-ten adults (sixty-one percent) say they would be helped at least somewhat in making decisions if they got training on how to find trustworthy information online.” Chances are, your local librarian will be able to help you with that very objective.

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Learn Your Library Resources: Services Edition – Notary Public and Passport Service at the Library

Special thanks to the Children’s Department Blog and Marta for writing this brief intro to two of our library’s most helpful services. 

NOTARY PUBLIC AND PASSPORT SERVICES AT YOUR LIBRARY!

Many libraries offer services that might surprise a few people. Two unusual things we offer are Notary Public and Passport services.

Notary

A notary public can witness a signature on a document with a proper photo ID. Remember not to sign the document, the notary must see you sign the document. There is a small fee for this service.

Passport EmblemYes, you can apply for a passport at our library! We have several passport acceptance agents who are trained by the Department of State to accept your application. Applications are available on line or you may pick one up at the library. You can also get your passport photo taken at the library, just let us know when you sign up for an appointment.

Unlike many places these services are available in the evening or on Saturdays.

Even Libraries Need Friends!

National friends of libraries week

Friends groups and foundations help libraries across the country enhance their services and programming by helping the libraries face budgetary challenges and the technological demands of today.

The Moline Public Library Friends Foundation is a volunteer group founded in 1990 and dedicated to supporting the Moline Public Library in order to enhance the services provided to library patrons. Its efforts, through the Friends run book store and fund raising, have provided the library with hundreds of thousands of dollars that were used to provide great and exciting services and programs.

So, if you love your library, thank a Friend today. Or better yet, become one!

What Would You Lose?

by , August 30, 2017, first appearing in Library Journal

Library Advocacy PosterU.S. libraries battle unprecedented challenges to federal support; you can help—and if you don’t have a copy yet, you can download and print the PDF of our poster, sponsored by Gale Cengage, highlighting services that libraries stand to lose without federal funding. These services were drawn from states’ 2013–17 plans for Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds granted by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Read it, post it in your library or around your community, and start a conversation.

Forget Jack-o’-Lanterns and Candy Corn, October is National Book Month!

Nat Book Month

Robert Adrian Hillman /Photo © Shutterstock

Oh man. This is tailor-made for libraries. Well… it’s tailor-made for books anyway, which we are all about. And all we have to do to show our support is exactly what we always do!

Which is to say, provide people with access to tens of thousands of books and encourage and enable those same people to read those same books. It’s perfect!

What can you do to show your appreciation for the dominant means of storing, transporting and spreading knowledge and understanding on Earth for the last 1,700 years or so (before books it was all scrolls and wax and rocks)?

Take time out from planning your costume parties and hanging fake cobwebs and stop by the library. Check out that old favorite, or that new book you’ve been meaning to read, or, if all else fails, ask a librarian to suggest something for you (if you plan it ahead of time you can fill out a Library Concierge form and have a list of five personally tailored recommendations waiting for you). Welcome to October and happy reading.

The Only Stupid Question Is the One You Don’t Ask

That said…

It’s Ask a Stupid Question Day!

Burning Questions

Got any burning questions? … See what I did there?

Originally started by teachers in order to encourage their students to be curious and to think about and question the things around them, it translates quite nicely to a library setting.

Teachers in school teach in a proactive way, planning ahead of time what their students will learn and the best way to accomplish said learning. Librarians teach too, but we’re more reactive than proactive. We don’t plan out what knowledge to impart to people. We wait for them to come to us looking for a specific piece of knowledge and we either find it for them or help them to find it for themselves. So what better place to ask a “stupid” question than at a library?!

When did synchronized swimming become an Olympic sport? What are the origins of “Tuesday”? Why can’t I give my dog chocolate? What happened to the dinosaurs? What time is it in Dublin? Why do you drive on parkways and park on driveways? Whatever question you’ve got, come in to the library today and we will either find you an answer or do our level best to point you in the right direction.