12 THE HATE U GIVE Quotes that Need to Be in the Movie

The Hate U GiveIf you’ve been following us here at Book Riot even a little, you’ll have a fair idea of just how in love we are with Angie Thomas’s YA debut novel, The Hate U Give. The book follows Starr Carter, a 16-year-old black girl whose world changes after she witnesses her best friend being shot. The book hit the New York Times Bestseller List, inspired hundreds of young activists, and believe it or not, was banned by some authorities and institutions across the U.S.

If you haven’t had a chance to pick up this beautiful, heartbreaking marvel of a book, you have around a month before we are blessed with the movie adaptation, starring Amandla Stenberg, KJ Apa, Issa Rae, and Regina Hall. The book has everything, from profound words about black activism and police brutality to cozy, quippy family banter. I have no doubt the movie will be a gorgeous inspiring tearjerker, and here are some of my favourite The Hate U Give quotes I’d love to see come to life.

  1. Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.
  2. What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?
  3. Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.
  4. You can destroy wood and brick, but you can’t destroy a movement.
  5. Your voices matter, your dreams matter, your lives matter. Be the roses that grow in the concrete.
  6. ‘Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared, Starr,’ she says. ‘It means you go on even though you’re scared. And you’re doing that.’
  7. I’ll never forget. I’ll never give up. I’ll never be quiet. I promise.
  8. At an early age I learned that people make mistakes, and you have to decide if their mistakes are bigger than your love for them.
  9. My nana likes to say that spring brings love. Spring in Garden Heights doesn’t always bring love, but it promises babies in the winter.
  10. “What is Tumblr anyway? Is it like Facebook?”
    “No, and you’re forbidden to get one. No parents allowed. You guys already took over Facebook.”
  11. It’s also about Oscar.
    Trayvon.
    Rekia.
    Michael.
    Eric.
    Tamir.
    John.
    Ezell.
    Sandra.
    Freddie.
    Alton.
    Philando.
    It’s even about that little boy in 1955 who nobody recognized at first—Emmett.

If you’re still not sold on Angie Thomas’s magic:

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What are your favorite The Hate U Give quotes? Oh, and if you’re here because you loved the book as much as we did, we gotcha. Here’s a list of brilliant books if you’re looking for read-alikes!

By , September 
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10 Canine Quotes for the Dog Days of Summer

Painting by Bernard te Gempt, via Wikimedia Commons

A quote attributed to W.H. Auden says: “In times of joy, all of us wished we possessed a tail we could wag.” As we enter the time of year fancifully referred to as the Dog Days of summer (a reference to Sirius, the dog star), wagging might seem like it requires too much energy, but there’s still plenty we can learn from our dog friends in terms of loyalty, companionship, and forbearance. And if you think you’re hot, try taking a walk in a fur coat sometime!

 

Nancy Mitford, The Pursuit of Love, 1945
“Even if I take him out for three hours every day, and go and chat to him for another hour, that leaves twenty hours for him all alone with nothing to do. Oh, why can’t dogs read?”

John Grogan, Marley and Me: Life and Love With the World’s Worst Dog, 2005
“Dogs are great. Bad dogs, if you can really call them that, are perhaps the greatest of them all.”

Dean Koontz, A Big Little Life: A Memoir of a Joyful Dog, 2009
“When you have dogs, you witness their uncomplaining acceptance of suffering, their bright desire to make the most of life in spite of the limitations of age and disease, their calm awareness of the approaching end when their final hours come. They accept death with a grace that I hope I will one day be brave enough to muster.”

Daphne du Maurier, Rebecca, 1938
“Why did dogs make one want to cry? There was something so quiet and hopeless about their sympathy. Jasper, knowing something was wrong, as dogs always do. Trunks being packed. Cars being brought to the door. Dogs standing with drooping tails, dejected eyes. Wandering back to their baskets in the hall when the sound of the car dies away.”

U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Military Working Dog Training Handbook, 2012
“Revenge and temper tantrums have absolutely no place in dog training — you must not let training turn into a spectacle of one dumb animal hurting another.”

Ursula K. Le Guin, Changing Planes, 2003
“There are talking dogs all over the place, unbelievably boring they are, on and on and on about sex and shit and smells, and smells and shit and sex, and do you love me, do you love me, do you love me.”

Pablo Neruda, from “A Dog Has Died” in Winter Garden, 1986
“Joyful, joyful, joyful,
as only dogs know how to be happy
with only the autonomy
of their shameless spirit.”

Jodi Picoult, My Sister’s Keeper, 2003
“Reason number 106 why dogs are smarter than humans,” I say. “Once you leave the litter, you sever contact with your mothers”

Ogden Nash, The Private Dining-room and Other Verses, 1964
“A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of.”

Trevor Noah, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood, 2016
“I believed that Fufi was my dog, but of course that wasn’t true. Fufi was a dog. I was a boy. We got along well. She happened to live in my house. That experience shaped what I’ve felt about relationships for the rest of my life: You do not own the thing that you love. I was lucky to learn that lesson at such a young age. I have so many friends who still, as adults, wrestle with feelings of betrayal. They’ll come to me angry and crying and talking about how they’ve been cheated on and lied to, and I feel for them. I understand what they’re going through. I sit with them and buy them a drink and I say, ‘Friend, let me tell you the story of Fufi.’”

9 Quotes About The Library As A Temple

Image of New York Public Library via Wikimedia Commons

In an age when libraries must clamor to justify their existence, and serve as battlegrounds for social issues ranging from homelessness to feminism to free speech (or any combination thereof), it can be easy to lose sight of the simple pleasures this institution still affords to anyone who darkens their local branch’s door – particularly those who lack books of their own, or a quiet place in which to read them.

It’s important to remember that the history of libraries is full of such battles. While it’s widely believed that the great Alexandrian library burned to the ground, history paints a much thornier picture. According to Wikipedia’s source, “The library actually declined gradually over the course of roughly 800 years, starting with the purging of intellectuals from Alexandria in 145 BC during the reign of Ptolemy VIII Physcon, which resulted in Aristarchus of Samothrace, the last recorded head librarian, resigning from his position and exiling himself to Cyprus.”

To this day, those who’ve grown up exploring the world (and themselves) through books tend to regard libraries as a temple or sacred space – in which a librarian serves a Magister Templi, guiding pilgrims on quests both esoteric and mundane. The following quotes may help rekindle your appreciation for that local building that houses so many mysteries.

J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, 1998

“’That’s what Hermione does,’ said Ron, shrugging. ‘When in doubt, go to the library.”

 

Shelby Foote, as quoted in North Carolina Libraries, 1993

“A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.”

 

Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore, 2002

“When I open them, most of the books have the smell of an earlier time leaking out  between the pages – a special odor of the knowledge and emotions that for ages have been calmly resting between the covers. Breathing it in, I glance through a few pages before returning each book to its shelf.”

 

Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, 1985

“In the library I felt better, words you could trust and look at till you understood them, they couldn’t change half way through a sentence like people, so it was easier to spot a lie.”

 

Barbara Kingsolver, The Poisonwood Bible, 1998

“I attempted briefly to consecrate myself in the public library, believing every crack in my soul could be chinked with a book.”

 

Jean-Paul Sartre, The Words, 1963

“I had found my religion: nothing seemed more important to me than a book. I saw the library as a temple.”

 

Stephen King, It, 1986

“He sat there studiously bent over his work (Bill saw him), which lay in a slant of crisp white winterlight, his face sober and absorbed, knowing that to be a librarian was to come as close as any human being can to sitting in the peak-seat of eternity’s engine.”

 

Marilyn Johnson, This Book Is Overdue!: How Librarians and Cybrarians Can Save Us All, 2010

“Librarians’ values are as sound as Girl Scouts’: truth, free speech, and universal literacy. And, like Scouts, they possess a quality that I think makes librarians invaluable and indispensable: they want to help. They want to help us. They want to be of service. And they’re not trying to sell us anything.”

 

Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?, 2011

“’Whenever I am troubled,’ said the librarian, ‘I think about the Dewey decimal system.’

‘Then what happens?’ asked the junior, rather overawed.

‘Then I understand that trouble is just something that has been filed in the wrong place. That is what Jung was explaining of course – as the chaos of our unconscious contents strive to find their rightful place in the index of consciousness.’”

 

Infinite Facts: 15 Quotes on the Importance of a Free Press

Associated Press photo by Alex Brandon, 2017

Hating journalism has always been in fashion, and many of our literary heroes regarded it as one of the lowest professions. W.B. Yeats believed there was nothing in journalists but “tittering jeering emptiness,” and Hunter S. Thompson – a reporter himself – described his colleagues using language that we’re not inclined to repeat.

However, thanks to a looming constitutional crisis (and a press-hating demagogue having turned the Oval Office into a throne room), the events of the next few months are likely to be dictated by the public’s remaining trust in the institution of the free press. Whose version of events will the public be inclined to believe, and what percentage is necessary to reach an actionable consensus? Can any facts be considered beyond dispute, and how will that logic hold up against braying and volcanic mud-slinging from the highest seat in the nation?

The US may have recently withdrawn from the United Nations’ Human Rights Council, but we’d be wise not to ditch their prevailing wisdom on the importance of the press: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” Weigh that against the fact that our Department of Homeland Security is currently compiling a database of journalists and “media-influencers,” and keep it in mind in coming weeks as events continue to unfold.

The following authors (some of whom are also journalists) have important words to share with us about the power of the press, and the guiding principles of freedom and fairness when it comes to taking aim at powerful targets. Hate dedicated reporters all you want… but you’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Walter Cronkite, interview in Playboy, 1973

“I think being a liberal, in the true sense, is being nondoctrinaire, nondogmatic, non-committed to a cause – but examining each case on its merits. Being left of center is another thing; it’s a political position. I think most newspapermen by definition have to be liberal; if they’re not liberal, by my definition of it, then they can hardly be good newspapermen. If they’re preordained dogmatists for a cause, then they can’t be very good journalists; that is, if they carry it into their journalism.”

Peggy Noonan, Patriotic Grace: What It Is and Why We Need It Now, 2008

“I should say here, because some in Washington like to dream up ways to control the Internet, that we don’t need to ‘control’ free speech, we need to control ourselves.”

Thomas Jefferson, The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Retirement Series, Volume 9, 2012

“Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.”

George Orwell, “The Prevention of Literature,” 1946

“Freedom of the Press, if it means anything at all, means the freedom to criticize and oppose”

John Grogan, Bad Dogs Have More Fun: Selected Writings on Family, Animals, and Life from The Philadelphia Inquirer, 2007

“In the English language, it all comes down to this: Twenty-six letters, when combined correctly, can create magic. Twenty-six letters form the foundation of a free, informed society.”

Seno Gumira Ajidarma, Ketika Jurnalisme Dibungkam Sastra Harus Bicara, 1997

“When journalism is silenced, literature must speak. Because while journalism speaks with facts, literature speaks with truth.”

Anna Politkovskaya, Is Journalism Worth Dying For?: Final Dispatches, 2011

“How we react to the tragedy of one small person accurately reflects our attitude towards a whole nationality, and increasing the numbers doesn’t change much.”

Chinua Achebe, The Education of a British-Protected Child: Essays, 2010

“The foreign correspondent is frequently the only means of getting an important story told, or of drawing the world’s attention to disasters in the making or being covered up. Such an important role is risky in more ways than one. It can expose the correspondent to actual physical danger; but there is also the moral danger of indulging in sensationalism and dehumanizing the sufferer. This danger immediately raises the question of the character and attitude of the correspondent, because the same qualities of mind which in the past separated a Conrad from a Livingstone, or a Gainsborough from the anonymous painter of Francis Williams, are still present and active in the world today. Perhaps this difference can best be put in one phrase: the presence or absence of respect for the human person.”

Michael Moore, Here Comes Trouble, 2011

“One thing I learned as a journalist is that there is at least one disgruntled person in every workplace in America — and at least double that number with a conscience. Hard as they try, they simply can’t turn their heads away from an injustice when they see one taking place.”

Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States, 1980

“I knew that a historian (or a journalist, or anyone telling a story) was forced to choose, out of an infinite number of facts, what to present, what to omit. And that decision inevitably would reflect, whether consciously or not, the interests of the historian.”

Jon Ronson, The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry, 2011

“We journalists love writing about eccentrics. We hate writing about impenetrable, boring people. It makes us look bad: the duller the interviewee, the duller the prose. If you want to get away with wielding true, malevolent power, be boring.”

Joan Didion, Slouching Toward Bethlehem, 1968

“My only advantage as a reporter is that I am so physically small, so temperamentally unobtrusive, and so neurotically inarticulate that people tend to forget that my presence runs counter to their best interests. And it always does.”

Mikhail Bulgakov, Manuscripts Don’t Burn: Mikhail Bulgakov A Life in Letters and Diaries, 1991

“To struggle against censorship, whatever its nature, and whatever the power under which it exists, is my duty as a writer, as are calls for freedom of the press. I am a passionate supporter of that freedom, and I consider that if any writer were to imagine that he could prove he didn’t need that freedom, then he would be like a fish affirming in public that it didn’t need water.”

John Scalzi, Unlocked: An Oral History of Haden’s Syndrome, 2014

“The trick is not to find the story of the century. You won’t miss that story when it happens. No one will miss it. The trick is to find the story of the day and for that day make whoever reads it or hears it care about it so intensely that it doesn’t leave them. Then it becomes a story of their life. Maybe even the story of their life.”

E.B. White, One Man’s Meat, 1944

“The United States, almost alone today, offers the liberties and the privileges and the tools of freedom. In this land the citizens are still invited to write their plays and books, to paint their pictures, to meet for discussion, to dissent as well as to agree, to mount soapboxes in the public square, to enjoy education in all subjects without censorship, to hold court and judge one another, to compose music, to talk politics with their neighbors without wondering whether the secret police are listening, to exchange ideas as well as goods, to kid the government when it needs kidding, and to read real news of real events instead of phony news manufactured by a paid agent of the state. This is a fact and should give every person pause.”

Happy Father’s Day!

What can we say about dads?

It is hard to sum it all up, so we’ll take the easy way out and let other people try. 

Here are 15 quotes from books and authors about fathers.

“It was times like these when I thought my father, who hated guns and had never been to any wars, was the bravest man who ever lived.”

—Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

 

“He promised us that everything would be okay. I was a child, but I knew that everything would not be okay. That did not make my father a liar. It made him my father.”

—Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

 

“There’s no shame in fear, my father told me, what matters is how we face it.”

―George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings

 

“[…] never could I expect to be so truly beloved and important; so always first and always right in any man’s eyes as I am in my father’s.”

—Jane Austen, Emma

 

“… out of a sense of duty and, perhaps love, [he] adopted a role called Being a Father so that his child would have something mythical and infinitely important: a Protector, who would keep a lid on all the chaotic and catastrophic possibilities of life.”

—Tom Wolfe, The Bonfire of the Vanities

 

Tie“When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around. But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years.”

—Mark Twain

 

“Perhaps that is what it means to be a father – to teach your child to live without you.”

—Nicole Krauss

 

“He was a father. That’s what a father does. Eases the burdens of those he loves. Saves the ones he loves from painful last images that might endure for a lifetime.”

—George Saunders, Tenth of December

 

“I believe that what we become depends on what our fathers teach us at odd moments, when they aren’t trying to teach us. We are formed by little scraps of wisdom.”

—Umberto Eco, Foucault’s Pendulum

 

“A father is the one friend upon whom we can always rely. In the hour of need, when all else fails, we remember him upon whose knees we sat when children, and who soothed our sorrows; and even though he may be unable to assist us, his mere presence serves to comfort and strengthen us.”

—Émile Gaboriau, File No. 113

 

Dad Mug“Listen, there is no way any true man is going to let children live around him in his home and not discipline and teach, fight and mold them until they know all he knows. His goal is to make them better than he is.”

― Victor Devlin

 

“Blessed indeed is the man who hears many gentle voices call him father.”

― Lydia Maria Francis Child

 

“At sixteen, you still think you can escape from your father. You aren’t listening to his voice speaking through your mouth, you don’t see how your gestures already mirror his; you don’t see him in the way you hold your body, in the way you sign your name. You don’t hear his whisper in your blood.”

― Salman Rushdie, East, West

 

“Being a dad is quite rewarding and even magical at times. It is our greatest chance to do something right in our lives that will keep making the world a brighter place even generations after we are gone.”

― Timothy Pina, Bullying Ben: How Benjamin Franklin Overcame Bullying

 

“[My father] taught me that there is no shame in breaking something, only in not being able to fix it.”

― Hope Jahren, Lab Girl

The Cosmic Perspective: 10 Stirring Quotes By Carl Sagan

Image © Shutterstock

In trying times, it helps to step several feet back — or several light years — and remember the relative size of this stage our entire lives play out on. Carl Sagan was a huge help in this regard, relating 20th century scientific discoveries in a tone both poetic and humorous, unlocking the public’s understanding of the vastness of our cosmos.

Image result for carl saganThough he departed our world back in ’96, Sagan left behind an impressive canon of works exploring science, spirituality, and the mysteries of human existence. If you’re looking for answers, he may have them, and if you’re looking for even bigger questions… well, you’re about to hit the mother lode. The following quotes represent just a tiny slice of Sagan’s wit and wisdom, but still enough to help turn down the volume on all the lamenting and sabre-rattling from fellow Earthlings that constantly threatens to overwhelm us.

Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, 1994

“It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

Cosmos, 1980

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark, 1995

“Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality.”

Contact, 1985

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

Billions & Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium, 1997

“I would love to believe that when I die I will live again, that some thinking, feeling, remembering part of me will continue. But as much as I want to believe that, and despite the ancient and worldwide cultural traditions that assert an afterlife, I know of nothing to suggest that it is more than wishful thinking.”

Broca’s Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science, 1979

“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

Shadows Of Forgotten Ancestors: A Search For Who We Are, 1992

“Nature is unsentimental. Death is built in.”

The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God, 2006

“Extinction is the rule. Survival is the exception.”

The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark, 1995

“Books, purchasable at low cost, permit us to interrogate the past with high accuracy; to tap the wisdom of our species; to understand the point of view of others, and not just those in power; to contemplate–with the best teachers–the insights, painfully extracted from Nature, of the greatest minds that ever were, drawn from the entire planet and from all of our history. They allow people long dead to talk inside our heads. Books can accompany us everywhere. Books are patient where we are slow to understand, allow us to go over the hard parts as many times as we wish, and are never critical of our lapses. Books are key to understanding the world and participating in a democratic society.”

Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, 1994

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.”

By 

In Honor of the First Day of Winter…

Frozen Silence: 10 Quotes About Extreme Cold

Photo by Dave Lauretti, via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve romanticized the winter freeze in many a Christmas carol, but to those who’ll spend the entire season huddled by the nearest fireplace, space heater, or radiator, the plunge in temperature is no trifling matter — and for those without shelter, the weather could even prove deadly.

 

George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones, 1996
“Nothing burns like the cold. But only for a while. Then it gets inside you and starts to fill you up, and after a while you don’t have the strength to fight it.”

Cormac McCarthy, The Road, 2006
“Where all was burnt to ash before them no fires were to be had and the nights were long and dark and cold beyond anything they’d yet encountered. Cold to crack the stones. To take your life.”

Stephen King, The Dark Tower, 2004
“For over a long period of time there’s little in life so disheartening as constant cold — not deep enough to kill, mayhap, but always there, stealing your energy and your will and your body-fat, an ounce at a time.”

Edith Wharton, The Triumph Of The Night, 1914
“The blast that swept him came off New Hampshire snow-fields and ice-hung forests. It seemed to have traversed interminable leagues of frozen silence, filling them with the same cold roar and sharpening its edge against the same bitter black-and-white landscape.

Guy de Maupassant, Bel-Ami, 1885
“It was one of those bitter mornings when the whole of nature is shiny, brittle, and hard, like crystal. The trees, decked out in frost, seem to have sweated ice; the earth resounds beneath one’s feet; the tiniest sounds carry a long way in the dry air; the blue sky is bright as a mirror, and the sun moves through space in icy brilliance, casting on the frozen world rays which bestow no warmth upon anything.”

Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit — Will Travel, 1958
“What sort of ‘water’ was that? Methane? What was the ‘snow’? Solid ammonia? I didn’t have tables to tell me what was solid, what was liquid, and what was gas at whatever hellish cold Pluto enjoyed in the ‘summer’. All I knew was that it got so cold in its winter that it didn’t have any gas or liquid — just vaccum, like the Moon.”

Donna Tartt, The Secret History, 1992
“It never occurred to me that half of the population of Vermont wasn’t experiencing pretty much what I put myself through every night- bone-crackling cold that made my joints ache, cold so relentless I felt it in my dreams: ice floes, lost expeditions, the lights of search planes swinging over whitecaps as I floundered alone Arctic Seas.”

Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness, 1969
“On a world where a common table implement is a little device with which you crack the ice that has formed on your drink between drafts, hot beer is a thing you come to appreciate.”

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, 1908
“No animal, according to the rules of animal-etiquette, is ever expected to do anything strenuous, or heroic, or even moderately active during the off-season of winter.”

Haruki Murakami, Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, 2006
“Ice contains no future, just the past, sealed away. As if they’re alive, everything in the world is sealed up inside, clear and distinct. Ice can preserve all kinds of things that way — cleanly, clearly. That’s the essence of ice, the role it plays.”

e.e. cummings, ViVa, 1931
“The snow doesn’t give a soft white damn Whom it touches.”