Genre Friday – Pastiche

We continue to stretch (and occasionally ignore) the definition of “genre” here on Genre Friday. This time around we’re dealing not with a “genre” that is tied together by similar form, or theme, or subject, but by what it is attempting to do instead. That’s right, it’s pastiche time.

First, it’s pronounced pa’ steesh.

Second, it’s sort of like that saying that imitation is the most sincere form of flattery. Unlike parody, that imitates something in order to poke fun at it, pastiche imitates something to honor it or to bring it to life for a new generation. The results of such an attempt can be light-hearted, even flippant, but it is still generally respectful of the original material. It is done as much out of admiration for the original art or artist (and it can be applied to any art form – painting, films, music, literature, etc.) as anything else.

It’s actually a really nice idea if you think about it.

House of Silk

“Hey, Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, Raymond Chandler, James Joyce, Agatha Christie, and so on, and so on, I am really picking up what you’re putting down. I want to be like you when I grow up.”

Sometimes the new work is only loosely related to the original (think West Side Story and Romeo and Juliet). Sometimes it is an off-shoot or continuation of a pre-existing story or set of stories. Anthony Horowitz’s The House of Silk, for example, is an authorized continuation of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Alexandra Ripley’s Scarlett, however, is not an official sequel to Gone with the Wind, but still pays homage to the original source in its style and subject, not to mention main character.

Plus, once you get the hang of it, it’s kind of fun to say. Pastiche.

 

It may be too late for some of us…

10 BooksWe all remember our high school literary staples. Who could forget reading The Great Gatsby or Scarlet Letter at a tiny desk in a 10th grade English class? These books are important and unforgettable; however, in their flurry to finish 50 pages of Animal Farm in one night, high school students tend to gloss over the modern pieces and even classics that do not often find a spot in their high school syllabi or the usually repetitive lists of “10 Books to Read Before College.” OverDrive is here to both remind you of and introduce you to these brilliant books that are not only integral to a high school student’s literary repertoire, but also, and perhaps more importantly, fun to read.

Sasha Zborovsky, OverDrive Marketing Intern

10 BOOKS YOU NEVER KNEW YOU NEEDED TO READ BEFORE COLLEGE

And even if, like me, college is an increasingly distant memory for you, or if college was never a stop on your particular path, a good book recommendation is always an exciting thing. I may even be more exciting now – let the high schoolers worry about expanding their ‘literary repertoire.’ We can read for fun!

Best Sellers – Dog Days of Summer Edition

Why do they call it that? My dog hates this time of year.

NYT Combined Print & eBook Fiction

  1. THE LATE SHOW by Michael Connelly

Late ShowIntroducing a new series starring a driven young detective trying to prove herself in the LAPD. Renée Ballard works the night shift in Hollywood. A once up-and-coming detective, she’s been given this beat as punishment after filing a sexual harassment complaint against a supervisor. Each morning she turns her cases over to day shift detectives to finish and take credit for. Until she is given two cases that she can’t just give up at dawn. Against orders and her own partner’s wishes, she works both cases by day while maintaining her shift by night. As the cases entwine they pull her closer to her own demons and make her more determined than ever to hang on to her job no matter what the department throws at her.

  1. THE WHISTLER by John Grisham
  2. WILDFIRE by Ilona Andrews (NEW)
  3. CAMINO ISLAND by John Grisham
  4. HOUSE OF SPIES by Daniel Silva
  5. READY PLAYER ONE by Ernest Cline (NEW)
  6. PARADISE VALLEY by C.J. Box (NEW)
  7. THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10 by Ruth Ware
  8. THE LYING GAME by Ruth Ware (NEW)
  9. THE MOORES ARE MISSING by James Patterson and others (NEW)

Happy BOOK LOVERS DAY!

Heart Books

Love books? Good.

Maybe we’re biased but we love people that love books. And today is your day!

Book Lovers Day is typically considered the day for people that love reading to celebrate their most cherished books, and that’s great, but let us not forget that it is called Book Lovers Day, not Book Day. So make sure to take a moment today to appreciate just how cool you are for loving books too.

And if you feel like showing that love by being surrounded by books, maybe even finding a few new ones that you didn’t even know you wanted to read, we’re open until 8pm. Feel free to stop by.

Have you met Libby?

Meet Libby

Have you ever used the OverDrive app? You know, the one that gives you access to OMNI Libraries, Moline Library’s shared collection of eBooks and eAudiobooks. Maybe you use it all the time, or maybe you have never used it, or maybe you have used it a few times but always thought it was just a little too much to set up and remember to make you want to use it often.

Enter Libby. Whether you are a first time user or an old pro at checking out ebooks, it’s worth checking out this new app.

Libby is the new app patrons using Android, Apple and Windows devices can use to access OMNI Libraries instead of the old OverDrive app. You get the same eBooks from the same place but from an app with easier setup, fewer steps to check out and download your books and a much more adorable icon. Check out Libby today!

Happy PAPERBACK BOOK DAY!

“Portable and relatively cheap, paperback books were to the 19th century what ebooks are to today.”

– Me, 20 minutes ago while thinking of what to write in this post

Paperback

Close your eyes and imagine… Wait. This isn’t going to work, you need your eyes to read.

Leave your eyes open and imagine yourself in the 1800s. You’re at a railroad station somewhere in Iowa or Illinois and you are bidding friends and family farewell as you prepare to board a train bound for Silver Bow, Montana. That’s where your great Aunt Minnie lives with her two tomcats, Trevor and Leroy, and you’re going to stay with her for the summer… but we’re getting off topic. The trip is going to take somewhere in the neighborhood of 3 weeks. There won’t be much to do. You’re going to need something to read.

But books are expensive and heavy. What are you to do? Wait! What’s this? Paperback books for sale! Cheap, comparatively light and portable, and fun (not a lot of stuffy academic stuff makes it to paperback). Thank goodness, your sanity is saved!

A couple of hundred years later, the story is still largely the same. Perhaps ebooks have stolen some of their thunder and maybe you won’t be putting them out to impress company with how fancy and well read you are but paperback books are still cheaper and lighter than their hardcover counterparts. And they are still fun to read, mostly anyway (some of that aforementioned stuffy academic stuff has started to turn up as oversize paperbacks, but to each there own). Somewhere along the line we have all read and loved a paperback, whether it was picked up at the last minute before catching that long flight or passed on to you from a friend that said you really, really needed to read it. So let’s all take a moment today to appreciate the importance of the paperback, not just in literary history, but to each of us.