READ A BOOK DAY!

“If you know what I mean, great. If you don’t, doesn’t matter. But you should probably read more.”

– Steve Coogan as Tony Wilson in the film 24 Hour Party People

This one is pretty straight forward. If you have a book you’ve been meaning to read, today is the day. If you don’t have a book, I know where you can get one.

Party

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Book Movies coming in September

Fallen by Lauren Kate

Fallen Fallen_filmWhen it comes out: September 1
What the book is about: 17-year-old Lucinda falls in love with a gorgeous, intelligent boy, Daniel, at her new school, the grim, foreboding Sword & Cross . . . only to find out that Daniel is a fallen angel, and that they have spent lifetimes finding and losing one another as good & evil forces plot to keep them apart.

It by Stephen King

ItIt_filmWhen it comes out: September 8
What the book is about: It was the children who saw – and felt. In the storm drains, in the sewers, IT lurked, taking on the shape of their nightmares. Sometimes IT reached up, seizing, tearing, killing . . .
Time passed and the children grew up, moved away. The horror of IT was deep-buried, wrapped in forgetfulness. Until they were called back, once more to confront IT, reaching up again to make their past nightmares a terrible present reality.

Dan Leno and the Limehouse Golem by Peter Ackroyd

Dan Leno and the Limehouse GolemThe Limehouse Golem_filmWhen it comes out: September 8
What the book is about: Dan Leno, the great music hall comedian, was known in his lifetime as ‘the funniest man on earth’. So how could he have been involved in one of the most curious episodes in London’s history when, in a short period during the autumn of 1880, a series of murders was attributed to the mysterious ‘Limehouse Golem’?

First They Killed My Father by Loung Ung

First They Killed My FatherFirst They Killed My Father_filmWhen it comes out: September 15
What the book is about: Chronicles the brutality of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, from the author’s forced ”evacuation” of Phnom Penh in 1975 to her family’s subsequent movements from town to town and eventual separation.

J.D. Salinger: A Life by Kenneth Slawenski

(Film: Rebel in the Rye)

JD Salinger A LifeRebel in the Rye_filmWhen it comes out: September 15
What the book is about: One of the most popular and mysterious figures in American literary history, author of the classic Catcher in the Rye, J. D. Salinger eluded fans and journalists for most of his life. Now comes a new biography that is “energetic and magnificently researched”—a book from which “a true picture of Salinger emerges.”

Stronger by Jeff Bauman

StrongerStronger_filmWhen it comes out: September 22
What the book is about: When Jeff Bauman woke up on Tuesday, April 16th, 2013 in the Boston Medical Center, groggy from a series of lifesaving surgeries and missing his legs, the first thing he did was try to speak. When he realized he couldn’t, he asked for a pad and paper and wrote down seven words: “Saw the guy. Looked right at me,” setting off one of the biggest manhunts in the country’s history. Just thirty hours before, Jeff had been at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon cheering on his girlfriend, Erin, when the first bomb went off at his feet.

Victoria & Abdul by Shrabani Basu

Victoria and AbdulVictoria and Abdul_filmWhen it comes out: September 22
What the book is about: Abdul Karim, an assistant clerk at Agra Central Jail, suddenly finds himself a personal attendant to the Empress of India herself, Queen Victoria. Within a year, he is established as a powerful figure at court, becoming the queen’s teacher, or Munshi, and instructing her in Urdu and Indian affairs. Devastated by the death of John Brown, the queen had at last found his replacement. But her intense and controversial relationship with the Munshi led to a near-revolt in the royal household.

Genre Friday – Pastiche

We continue to stretch (and occasionally ignore) the definition of “genre” here on Genre Friday. This time around we’re dealing not with a “genre” that is tied together by similar form, or theme, or subject, but by what it is attempting to do instead. That’s right, it’s pastiche time.

First, it’s pronounced pa’ steesh.

Second, it’s sort of like that saying that imitation is the most sincere form of flattery. Unlike parody, that imitates something in order to poke fun at it, pastiche imitates something to honor it or to bring it to life for a new generation. The results of such an attempt can be light-hearted, even flippant, but it is still generally respectful of the original material. It is done as much out of admiration for the original art or artist (and it can be applied to any art form – painting, films, music, literature, etc.) as anything else.

It’s actually a really nice idea if you think about it.

House of Silk

“Hey, Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, Raymond Chandler, James Joyce, Agatha Christie, and so on, and so on, I am really picking up what you’re putting down. I want to be like you when I grow up.”

Sometimes the new work is only loosely related to the original (think West Side Story and Romeo and Juliet). Sometimes it is an off-shoot or continuation of a pre-existing story or set of stories. Anthony Horowitz’s The House of Silk, for example, is an authorized continuation of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Alexandra Ripley’s Scarlett, however, is not an official sequel to Gone with the Wind, but still pays homage to the original source in its style and subject, not to mention main character.

Plus, once you get the hang of it, it’s kind of fun to say. Pastiche.

 

Books to Film

Upcoming Movies Based on Books

The Coldest City by Antony Johnston (aka Atomic Blonde: The Coldest City)

The Coldest CityAtomic BlondeWhen it comes out: July 28

What the book is about: November 1989. Communism is collapsing, and soon the Berlin Wall will come down with it. But before that happens there is one last bit of cloak & dagger to attend to. Two weeks ago, an undercover MI6 officer was killed in Berlin. He was carrying a list that allegedly contains the name of every espionage agent working in Berlin, on all sides. No list was found on his body. Now Lorraine Broughton, an experienced spy with no pre-existing ties to Berlin, has been sent into this powderkeg of social unrest, counter-espionage, defections gone bad and secret assassinations to bring back the list and save the lives of the British agents whose identities reside on it.

The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

The Glass CastleThe Glass Castle_filmWhen it comes out: August 11

What the book is about: When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family. So, the Walls children learned to take care of themselves.

Tulip Fever by Deborah Moggach

Tulip FeverTulip Fever_filmWhen it comes out: August 25

What the book is about: In 1630s Amsterdam, tulipomania has seized the populace. Everywhere men are seduced by the fantastic exotic flower. But for wealthy merchant Cornelis Sandvoort, it is his young and beautiful wife, Sophia, who stirs his soul. He yearns for an heir, but so far he and Sophia have failed to produce one. In a bid for immortality, he commissions a portrait of them both by the talented young painter Jan van Loos. But as Van Loos begins to capture Sophia’s likeness on canvas, a slow passion begins to burn between the beautiful young wife and the talented artist.

Are we there yet? It’s been July forever!

July, aka NATIONAL ANTI-BOREDOM MONTH, is more than half-way over!

Fun Fact: It’s also NATIONAL READ AN ALMANAC MONTH. How those go together, we couldn’t tell you.

So, how are your boredom levels? Feeling listless? Weary? Have you recently made a sound something like this, “Uuuuuuuuu,’mso bored.”?

Bored

You should come to the library.

As my mother-in-law used to say, “Smart people don’t get bored.” I always took this as more of a challenge than a statement of literal fact, but, either way, we can help you with that.

Find a book, a video game, a movie, an audio book, anything. If you can’t pick one yourself fill out a Library Concierge form and we will pick some for you based on what you like. If that doesn’t work, surf the Internet on the public computers or grab something from our language section and start brushing up on your foreign languages. Even if everything else fails and you decide you don’t want that book or movie, have seen everything worthwhile on the Internet and decide that you don’t need to know conversational Swahili after all, then at least you got out of the house for a bit.

 

14 Favorite Book Sidekicks to Celebrate on Dr. Watson’s Birthday

Goodreads Blog: Posted by Hayley Igarashi on July 07, 2017

BudsToday is the birthday of one of literature’s most beloved and long-suffering sidekicks, Dr. John Watson. A war veteran as well as an accomplished writer and detective, Watson gives Sherlock Holmes much-needed backup and friendship, all while enduring less-than-complimentary observations about his character. “You have a grand gift for silence, Watson,” Sherlock says at one point. “It makes you quite invaluable as a companion.”

To celebrate the good doctor’s birthday, [goodreads.com] asked you on Facebook and Twitter to share your favorite book sidekicks. Check out some of the most popular answers below and add your own in the comments!

Sherlock1. Dr. John Watson
Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes books and stories

Sherlock’s friend, roommate, biographer, crime-solving partner and on-hand physician

 

Harry Potter2. Ron and Hermione
J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books

Harry’s fellow Gryffindors, friends, partners in managing mischief, frequent rescuers (especially Hermione) and family

Click here for the rest of the list…