Learn Your Library Resources – Out-of-System Loan Requests

As many of our patrons probably know Moline Public Library is, along with most of the other QCA libraries on the Illinois side of the river, in a library system called PrairiCat. This means a couple different things, but for patrons the main thing is that all of the libraries in the system share material with one another for free. And with nearly 160 different public and school library locations in the system that means we can generally find you what you want (if you don’t mind waiting a bit). But what happens if you want something that no one in our system seems to have?

Before you turn to Amazon, you might want to try an out-of-system loan request. 

WorldCat_Logo

An out-of-system request, or interlibrary loan (ILL for short), is an item borrowed from outside of PrairieCat. We can search for and request items from massive database of libraries across the country and even around the world. But there are a few catches.

  • MPL Only: Only Moline Public Library patrons in good standing can request an ILL from Moline Library. If you are from a different library, please contact your home library.
  • Small Fee: There is a $3 fee for requests for items. This covers postage and handling. This fee is paid when you receive the item you have requested.
  • Waiting Period: Waiting periods vary, will typically be longer than for requests (holds) placed within the PrairieCat system.
  • Checkout Period: The checkout period is at the discretion of the lending library. The item will be checked out to our library before it is sent to us. That means that, unlike system holds, the due date is already set before the item arrives at our library. For this reason, it is best to pick up your ILL item(s) as soon as possible.
  • Renewing: If you would like to renew an ILL, please contact the Circulation Department. We will have to contact the library system that we obtained the item from to ask for a renewal. For some systems, we will receive an answer right away. Other systems may require a few days to get back to us. Please ask for a renewal as soon as you know you need it.

How to Request an Interlibrary Loan

In Person

You can request an interlibrary loan by phone or in person.

Our staff are happy to place requests for you – please visit the library or call us at 309-524-2470.

PrairieCat ILL Request Form Online

You can find the PrairieCat ILL Request Form online.

  • Once your are on the PrairieCat ILL Request Form page select the type of material you are looking for from the Interlibrary Loan Order Forms table.
  • Enter your library card number, located on the back of your card, and your pin number, and click Submit.
  • Enter as much information as you have about the item. The more information you have, the better. However, don’t worry if you don’t have all the information requested on the form.
  • Click Submit This Request at the bottom.
  • If you would like additional items, please go back to the ILL form and submit your additional requests.

You can find the PrairieCat ILL Request Form page through your Library Account.

  • Click on the Account button on the Moline Library website
  • Enter your library card number, located on the back of your card, and your pin number, and click Submit.
  • On the bottom, right hand corner of the page the is a list of links titled “Library Links.” Click on the ILL request form link to be taken to the PrairieCat ILL Request Form page

When Your Request is Submitted

If we can find the item you are looking for, we will place your request. Be aware that we may not be able to get every item, especially newer and rare items, and, if we can get them, the wait might be longer for harder to find or more popular items. We will contact you if we are unable to find the item.

When we have placed the request, the title will show up in your account under ILL with the phrase “Awaiting Arrival.” This means that the item has been requested – it does not mean that the item is on its way. The library system that has the requested item can still deny to fulfill the request. 

 

If you have more questions, please contact the Circulation Department.

Advertisements

The Best Dads in Fiction: A 4-Book Literary Guide to Fatherhood

Mark Williams and Bonnie Wright in ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ (2011)/Photo by Jaap Buitendijk © 2011 Warner Bros Entertainment Inc.

Parenthood is a common topic in literature for obvious reasons – the abundance of turmoil being chief among them. Fatherhood has specifically been increasingly on my mind as of late. For me, it’s looming – with all the attendant anxiety, hope, misgivings, and doubts that collectively make up this hazy concept of anticipation – just on the horizon. My wife is due with our first child by year’s end, and as is customary in these situations, our little guy will be arriving with no consideration of whether I am prepared or not (apparently kids are funny that way).

Despite receiving many assurances that I will know what to do when this tiny bundle of humanity arrives, I have my doubts. While these waters are undoubtedly well-traveled and well-charted, the journey is nonetheless a daunting one. As is often the case with virtually all other facets of life, literature is a remarkable place to turn for guidance.

With an adventure that feels puzzling, exciting, and terrifying drawing ever closer, I turned to the well-worn pages of a handful of beloved books to puzzle out a possible ideal of fatherhood. Here’s what I found.

 

The cover of the book To Kill a MockingbirdTo Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee

Atticus Finch

Perhaps the pinnacle of literary fatherhood, Atticus Finch represents an ideal that may be unattainable, but is none the less worth striving for. Deeply kind with an unerring moral compass, Atticus gave his children a sense of the world as it was, and more importantly, as it should be. He did not hide Scout and Jem from the darkness of the society in which they were raised. Rather, he gave them a light to cut through that darkness with an eye toward a better tomorrow. It was a mark of not only love, but a deep respect for his children and their ability to understand the nuances of the world around them to hopefully leave it better than they found it. In the words of Atticus Finch, “I wanted you to see what real courage is. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do.”

 

The cover of the book Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's StoneHarry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

J.K. Rowling

Arthur Weasley

Arthur Weasley is one of my favorite literary fathers. The Weasley children were exasperated and beguiled by their father’s exploits. His unbridled love for the world around him, and for muggles, gave his children an understanding, whether they realized or not, of how to find joy in even the most simple life experiences. He was a father, a protector, a co-conspirator, a mentor, and a friend, likely to join in his children’s hijinks while also providing words of fatherly wisdom. Arthur was a man who loved life – its myriad and minute joys. Whether it’s his excitement in learning his sons absconded with his flying car, or a paternal aside with Harry to assure that he will be safe and taken of, Arthur Weasley is evidence of the delight and wonder that can be found in parenting.

 

13496A Game of Thrones

George R. R. Martin

Ned Stark

Quality fathers are not in particular abundance within the borders of Westeros. Ned Stark is a notable and appreciated exception. Though Ned was far too honorable and just to thrive in the world of A Song of Ice and Fire, his noble qualities made him a tremendous father and influence on the lives of not only the Stark children, but Jon Snow and even Theon Greyjoy. Indeed, his acceptance of both Jon and Theon are markers of his caring, stern, paternalistic nature. Similar to Atticus Finch, Ned understood the harsh realities of the lives his children would lead, and he did his best to prepare them for what was to come. More than anything else, Ned sought to instill in his children a sense of responsibility. While certainly an extreme and severe example, when Ned requires his sons to witness him executing a deserter of the Night’s Watch, he modeled for his children that while there are consequences for one’s actions, responsibility must also be taken for one’s decisions. It was a harsh lesson, but an essential one.

 

The cover of the book The Book ThiefThe Book Thief

Markus Zusak

Hans Huberman

When I think of the things that I would want for a child, much of it can be boiled to down to two traits – curiosity and wonder. They are things that are so easy to take for granted – but if happiness and contentment are the destination, curiosity and wonder may just be the path. Hans Huberman, or Papa as he is affectionately known to young Liesel in The Book Thief, helps Liesel to discover the world around through her growing desire and curiosity to read.  More importantly, it’s a journey he happily takes alongside her, guiding where he can but also encouraging her independence and inquisitiveness with his own. His kindness, patience, and exhilaration for the world around them – difficult and harrowing as it may be – proved a powerful example well worth emulating.

Travel Back in Time: 8 Illuminating History Books to Read Right Now

With everything that’s currently going on in the world, sometimes it’s necessary to take a step back (way back, in this case) and try to understand the world in which we live by learning about the past.

The list of eight books below are illuminating reads, packed with detailed information about significant historical events and figures that had lasting impacts on society. Spanning authors Ron Chernow, Kenneth Whyte, Robert Dallek, and more, these books are truly remarkable. So take a break from the present, and immerse yourself in these exceptional true stories of bygone days.

 

The cover of the book GrantGrant

Ron Chernow

Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Chernow, author of Alexander Hamilton, dazzles again with his biography of one of our most compelling generals and presidents: Ulysses S. Grant. Chernow’s evocative portrait of Grant showcases the highs and lows he experienced throughout his life, and provides readers with a deeper understanding of one our most underappreciated presidents. Grant is a masterful combination of research and style – it exposes the true story behind a Midwesterner that became extraordinary.

 

The cover of the book HooverHoover

Kenneth Whyte

This captivating biography documents the life of Herbert Hoover – one of the most remarkable Americans of the twentieth century. The text provides readers with an in-depth look at his life, his presidency, and his fight against the Great Depression that rocked this nation. Hoover’s vast successes and failures made him one of the most significant men in American history, and for the very first time, his momentous life is captured in a book for all to see.

 

The cover of the book The Three Lives of James MadisonThe Three Lives of James Madison

Noah Feldman

Noah Feldman examines the Founding Father who transformed the United States in his “three lives” as a revolutionary thinker, a partisan political strategist, and as president. Madison was ahead of his time – he predicted that foreign threats would negatively affect civil liberties, he feared growing economic inequality, and believed that government by the people demanded resistance to wealth. Madison recognized the importance of the opinions of others, and thought of the media as a safeguard to liberty. His achievements and his struggles continue to impact the United States today.

 

The cover of the book Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New OrleansAndrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans

Brian Kilmeade and Don Yeager

During the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson was ordered to assemble a coalition of frontier militiamen, French-speaking Louisianans, Cherokee and Choctaw Indians, freed slaves, and even some pirates. And on top of that, he had to defeat the most powerful military force in the world in the complex terrain of the Louisiana bayous. Basically, Jackson needed a miracle. Kilmeade and Yaeger make history come alive with this mesmerizing page-turner. Readers will have a whole new understanding of this great American general, and a renewed appreciation for the brave men who fought so that our country could become what it is today.

 

The cover of the book Martin LutherMartin Luther

Eric Metaxas

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes a compelling biography of one of the most inspiring men in modern history, Martin Luther. Five hundred years ago, Martin Luther’s Ninety-five These ignited outrage that would change everything he knew about the world. Eric Metaxas examines this revolutionary man, whose unwavering faith defied the power structure of Western Christianity, and propelled society into the future. Luther’s monumental faith and courage gave birth to the ideals of liberty, equality, and individualism that continue to influence us today.

 

The cover of the book Franklin D. RooseveltFranklin D. Roosevelt

Robert Dallek

Considering the current state of our nation, there is no better time to dive into Robert Dallek’s Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Political Life. Roosevelt was a man of compromise – he sought to unite a divided country, and succeeded to do so by exhibiting a great sense of humanity. Roosevelt became a champion of the poor, and won an unprecedented four presidential terms, transforming an isolationist country into an international superpower. This gripping biography contains valuable lessons for leaders around the world.

 

The cover of the book The Written WorldThe Written World

Martin Puchner

What would this world be without literature? Not very much. Literature has shaped civilization from the beginning of time, and in this groundbreaking book, Martin Puchner takes readers on a trip around the globe, travelling through to showcase the great stories that have created the world we know today. This is the story of how literature changed everything, in sixteen acts – from Alexander the Great and the Iliad to Harry Potter.

 

The cover of the book Prince CharlesPrince Charles

Sally Bedell Smith

Sally Bedell Smith examines the British royal family once again in this extraordinary biography. This time, her subject is Prince Charles – the oldest heir to the throne in more than three hundred years. This fascinating book required years of research, and includes hundreds of interviews with those who know Prince Charles the best. With never-before-seen details and intimate discoveries, Smith reveals that Prince Charles is more complex and compelling than we previously thought.

Books to Film: April Edition

You Were Never Really Here by Jonathan Ames

32792414You Were Never Really Here.pngMovie: You Were Never Really Here
When it comes out: April 6
What the book is about: Joe has witnessed things that cannot be erased. A former FBI agent and Marine, his abusive childhood has left him damaged beyond repair. He has completely withdrawn from the world and earns his living rescuing girls who have been kidnapped into the sex trade. When he’s hired to save the daughter of a corrupt New York senator held captive at a Manhattan brothel, he stumbles into a dangerous web of conspiracy, and he pays the price. As Joe’s small web of associates are picked off one by one, he realizes that he has no choice but to take the fight to the men who want him dead.

The Spinning Man by George Harrar

1536598SpinningMan-Poster.jpgMovie: The Spinning Man
When it comes out: April 6
What the book is about: Mild-mannered philosophy professor Evan Birch spends his days teaching college students to seek truth. Then, one afternoon, he’s pulled over by the police, handcuffed, and questioned about the disappearance of a local high school cheerleader. When the missing girl’s lipstick turns up in his car, the evidence against him begins to build. Even his wife and sons are having their doubts. And as the investigating officer engages him in a decidedly non-Socratic dialogue, Evan Birch begins to understand that truth may be elusive indeed-but sometimes you have to pick a story and stick with it…

Zama by Antonio di Benedetto

18490870Zama (2017 film).pngMovie: Zama
When it comes out: April 13
What the book is about: Zama takes place in the last decade of the eighteenth century and describes the solitary, suspended existence of Don Diego de Zama, a highly placed servant of the Spanish crown who has been posted to Asunción, the capital of remote Paraguay. There, eaten up by pride, lust, petty grudges, and paranoid fantasies, he does as little as he possibly can while plotting his eventual transfer to Buenos Aires, where everything about his hopeless existence will, he is confident, be miraculously transformed and made good.

The House of Tomorrow by Peter Bognanni

6552346The House of Tomorrow poster.jpgMovie: The House of Tomorrow
When it comes out: April 20
What the book is about: Sebastian Prendergast lives in a geodesic dome with his eccentric grandmother, who homeschooled him in the teachings of futurist philosopher R. Buckminster Fuller. But when his grandmother has a stroke, Sebastian is forced to leave the dome and make his own way in town. Jared Whitcomb is a chain-smoking sixteen-year-old heart-transplant recipient who befriends Sebastian, and begins to teach him about all the things he has been missing, including grape soda, girls, and Sid Vicious.

Disobedience by Naomi Alderman

202677Disobedience.jpg

Movie: Disobedience
When it comes out: April 27
What the book is about: The story begins with the death of the community’s esteemed rabbi, which sets in motion plans for a memorial service and the search for a replacement. The rabbi’s nephew and likely successor, Dovid, calls his cousin Ronit in New York to tell her that her father has died. Ronit, who left the community long ago to build a life for herself as a career woman, returns home when she hears the news, and her reappearance exposes tears in the fabric of the community.

 

 

 

Books to Film: March Edition

Death Wish by Brian Garfield

1350986

Death wish 2017 poster.jpg

Movie: Death Wish
When it comes out: March 2
What the book is about: Paul Benjamin, a successful accountant in New York City, is enjoying a three-martini lunch when his home is broken into by a gang of drug addicts. For just a handful of money, they savagely beat Paul’s wife and daughter, leaving his wife dead and his daughter comatose. Grief-stricken and forced to reevaluate his views, Benjamin becomes disillusioned with society and plots his revenge on the perpetrators, whom the police are unable to bring to justice. Armed with a revolver and total disregard for his own safety, he sets out to even the score.

Red Sparrow by Jason Matthews

15803037Red Sparrow.pngMovie: Red Sparrow
When it comes out: March 2
What the book is about: In present-day Russia, ruled by blue-eyed, unblinking President Vladimir Putin, Russian intelligence officer Dominika Egorova struggles to survive in the post-Soviet intelligence jungle. Ordered against her will to become a “Sparrow,” a trained seductress, Dominika is assigned to operate against Nathaniel Nash, a young CIA officer who handles the Agency’s most important Russian mole.

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

18131AWrinkleInTimeTeaser.jpgMovie: A Wrinkle in Time
When it comes out: March 9
What the book is about: Meg’s father had been experimenting with this fifth dimension of time travel when he mysteriously disappeared. Now the time has come for Meg, her friend Calvin, and Charles Wallace to rescue him. But can they outwit the forces of evil they will encounter on their heart-stopping journey through space?

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

19547856Love, Simon poster.pngMovie: Love, Simon
When it comes out: March 16
What the book is about: Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

I Kill Giants by Joe Kelly & J. M. Ken Nimura (artist)

6435893

I Kill Giants movie poster

Movie: I Kill Giants
When it comes out: March 23
What the book is about: Barbara Thorson, a girl battling monsters both real and imagined, kicks butt, takes names, and faces her greatest fear in this bittersweet, coming-of-age story called “Best Indy Book of 2008” by IGN.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Ready Player One cover.jpgReady Player One (film).pngMovie: Ready Player One
When it comes out: March 29
What the book is about: In the year 2045, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

Lean on Pete by Willy Vlautin

6713642Lean on Pete poster.jpgMovie: Lean on Pete
When it comes out: March 30
What the book is about: Fifteen-year-old Charley Thompson wants a home, food on the table, and a high school he can attend for more than part of a year. But as the son of a single father working in warehouses across the Pacific Northwest, Charley’s been pretty much on his own. When tragic events leave him homeless weeks after their move to Portland, Oregon, Charley seeks refuge in the tack room of a run-down horse track. Charley’s only comforts are his friendship with a failing racehorse named Lean on Pete and a photograph of his only known relative. In an increasingly desperate circumstance, Charley will head east, hoping to find his aunt who had once lived a thousand miles away in Wyoming but the journey to find her will be a perilous one.

BOOKS & BESTIES: A GALENTINES’ DAY TREAT

galentines day

While I had crushes often as a teen – actors, boy bands, cute boys in my class – my first true love was my middle school best friend, Robin. She showed up at the start of 5th grade with huge, round glasses and a white satin Members Only jacket with a rainbow parrot on the back, and I knew I’d found my ride or die. We were both smart, weird kids with too much imagination (and maybe too little supervision) and we each recognized our soul mate immediately. Now, when I read YA books with a strong female friendship at the center, something hums deep in my chest – a joyful glimpse of my long-lost childhood friend – and I hold that story – the never-forgotten fierceness of that bond – dearer to my heart.

Literarily, Robin and I fell somewhere between Anne and Diana from the Green Gables books and Elaine and Cordelia from Margaret Atwood’s Cat’s Eye; only someone you love that much can make you that insane, after all. But when I polled some of my adulthood friends at OverDrive and asked what book included their representation of a female friendship, their responses filled my soul AND my TBR list!

LONG DISTANCE FRIENDSHIP

longer letter later galentinesFor me, it all started with P.S. Longer Letter Later by Paula Danziger and Anna M. Martin. I believe I was 12 years old when I first checked it out from my library and it warmed my awkward little heart. Elizabeth and Tara* Starr were so different from one another and that’s what worked in their transcontinental friendship. They were experiencing the same prepubescent horrors I was: boys, changing bodies, their parents’ imperfections, and their own growing awareness that Life. Is. Hard. Despite all that angst and hardship, they always had each other. It’s so important to show young girls the importance of female friendships. I think there is a common trope in literature where it’s “girl against the world.” But, that’s not how life works. You can have your great love, your great challenge, your great whatever, but no girl is ever far from that one friend who’d drop everything to help them weather whatever storm may come. — Christina Samek, Outreach Specialist

SISTER FRIENDS

pride and prejudice galentinesI must mention Jane and Elizabeth Bennett’s relationship in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Despite having three younger sisters, Jane and Elizabeth are the closest of Bennett girls. I think it’s because their unique traits complement each other so well. Elizabeth is headstrong to the point of prejudice and Jane is fair-minded to the point of naivete. Where Jane reserves her feelings, Elizabeth states them plainly. These two could hate each other for their differences, but instead they appreciate them and wish nothing but happiness for one another. — Briana Johnson-Sims, Training Specialist

FRIENDS STAY ON THE SAME PAGE

dumplin galentinesWillowdean and Ellen’s relationship in Julie Murphy’s Dumplin is the female friendship I love the most. These two know each other inside and out and are endlessly supportive of one another. I consider these two characters to be family, not friends. But, high school is a time where insecurities are at an all-time high. Jealously and uncertainties pop up daily and frustrations are taken out on those you are closest with. This storyline is extremely relatable for all kinds of relationships. Change is inevitable, but even through the ups and the downs, it ultimately always comes back to Willowdean and Ellen’s strong, loving, “on the same page,” friendship. — Lauren Bogatay, Collection Development Specialist

FAST AND FOREVER FRIENDS

white rabbit galentinesThe first pair of besties that popped into my mind was Ali Bell and Kat Parker from Gena Showalter’s White Rabbit Chronicles. Kat is a supporting character to Ali’s main, but they have an amazingly strong bond. Kat is apologetically Kat – that’s the best way to describe her. She’s fun and exciting, living for the moment and always speaking her mind. Ali is stubborn, determined, and fiercely loyal. Kat befriends Ali immediately and over the course of the series, their friendship remains true and constant. While the series itself is without a doubt one of my favorites (a white-hot romance, amazing characters, gripping plots, and jaw-dropping twists), the friendship between Ali and Kat is one its shining aspects. — Andrea Sieracki, Launch Specialist

 

Want more GALentines favorites? Check out our entire list.

Glitz, Glamour, Drama: 14 Books on High Society to Read Right Now

“The Great Gatsby” (2013)/Photo Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture © 2013 Bazmark Film III Pty Limited

Ever wonder what it would be like to have such an enormous amount of wealth that there would be no need to worry about, well, anything? Have you thought about what you would do with your spare time if you had a fortune off of which you could live, or what you would spend your money on? We’ve all imagined it, as unrealistic as it may be. Though being a part of high society is impossible for most of us, we can live vicariously through the characters in the stories that we read, whether they’re true or not.

So get lost in a life that isn’t yours – a life beyond your wildest dreams. These fourteen books will transport you to a different world, full of outrageous parties, glamour, scandal, and an overabundance of just about everything – especially drama.

The cover of the book The Edwardians

The Edwardians

Vita Sackville-West

Belonging to such a powerful, wealthy family comes with a price: You can’t choose your own life; it’s chosen for you. Tradition is of the utmost importance to the Edwardians, and must be upheld by future generations. Sebastian – the young, handsome, and temperamental heir – wants to veer from the path that his family has trod for years on end, but believes it to be impossible. When he meets Leonard Anquetil and Lady Roehampton, everything changes, including Sebastian’s perspective on his future. Sebastian’s sister Violet finds a way out of high society, and both siblings make the bold leap into a whole new world, leaving everything they know behind.

The cover of the book The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray is a classic read, and though it was published in 1890, it still resonates with readers today. The story centers around Dorian, who is an extremely wealthy and good-looking young man living in London. Dorian has a portrait of himself done by the great artist Basil and becomes obsessed with his own handsome, youthful appearance – so much so that he sells his soul for eternal youth and beauty. The book was originally attacked for exposing the dark side of Victorian society, and for evoking ideas of homosexuality.

The cover of the book Less Than Zero

Less Than Zero

Bret Easton Ellis

Clay’s break from college means going back home to Los Angeles and resuming a life of privilege, money, and recklessness. Everyone Clay knows has fallen into a vicious cycle of destructive behavior, always wanting a high that’s even better than the last, and Clay follows suit. This book showcases the less than glamorous side of the young elite in L.A., with more parties, drugs, and sex than you might ever imagine.

The cover of the book The Golden House

The Golden House

Salman Rushdie

When billionaire real estate tycoon Nero Golden moves to Manhattan from foreign shores, he and his three sons assume new identities and move into a grand mansion downtown. New York City natives are immediately intrigued by the bizarre newcomer and his family and the mystery that surrounds their arrival. The Golden’s neighbor, René – an ambitious young filmmaker, and narrator of the story – is especially curious, and finds the family to be the perfect subject for his work. The Golden House is a story of politics, pop culture, and identity, and serves as a force of light in current troubling times.

The cover of the book 740 Park

740 Park

Michael Gross

The apartment building at 740 Park has been Manhattan’s richest residence for seventy-five years now, and it’s certainly received a lot of attention. One apartment has thirty-seven rooms, fourteen bathrooms, forty-three closets, eleven working fireplaces, a private elevator, and his-and-hers saunas. It’s the kind of luxury of which most of us can only dream. The book begins with the story of the massive building’s construction in 1920s Manhattan, and explores how it attracted the richest, oldest families in the country. 740 Park gives readers a glimpse of the hidden lives of the wealthy residents as well as access to wealth, privilege, and all that entails. The social history of the American rich is laid out for all to see, uncensored and unprecedented.

The cover of the book The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece centers on the young, mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and Nick Carraway, the narrator of the story who moves next door to Gatsby’s lavish mansion. There are extravagant parties, love affairs, heartbreak, and a grand amount of dishonesty. The Great Gatsby explores themes of excessive nature, indulgence, idealism, and resistance to change. Creating a portrait of the Jazz Age and the Roaring ’20s, this wildly popular book is a literary classic and has inspired many adaptations throughout the decades.

The cover of the book Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is easily one of the most well-known novels in the United States and around the world. With the most compelling of stories and the most memorable characters, it has remained unparalleled for two hundred years. Readers will find themselves immersed in the Bennet family, comprised of a quiet father, a dutiful mother, and five beautiful daughters. Mrs. Bennet works to find eligible suitors for her five daughters to marry, but when Mr. Darcy, a handsome young man, and his equally charming and wealthy companion take residence nearby, everything changes. Grand country estates, beautiful young men and women, and unwavering courtship all comprise this endearing story of heartache and romance.

The cover of the book Rules of Civility

Rules of Civility

Amor Towles

On New Year’s Eve of 1937, twenty-five-year-old Katey Kontent finds herself second-rate Greenwich Village jazz bar when Tinker Grey, an extremely handsome banker, sits down next to her. They begin to mingle, and though she doesn’t know it at the time, Katey’s encounter with Grey will lead her into the upper class of New York society. To fit in with the elite, Katey will have to rely on her wittiness and her keen eye. Amor Towles’s lively depiction of New York’s social strata, along with his enchanting characters, make Rules of Civility a must-read for everyone.

The cover of the book The Bonfire of the Vanities

The Bonfire of the Vanities

Tom Wolfe

The Bonfire of the Vanities is a 1987 satirical novel centered on Sherman McCoy, a New York City bond trader with a wife and young daughter, who is rapidly losing his wealth. McCoy turns to his mistress, Maria Ruskin, for solace. One night, on a drive with Maria, Sherman accidentally enters the Bronx. He and Maria exit the car to determine where to go next, and are approached by two black men whom they perceive – uncertainly, in Sherman’s case – as predators. They quickly get back into the car and race away, striking one of the two boys. This compelling story focuses on racism, social class, politics, and greed in 1980s New York City, and captures what it truly means to have privilege.

The cover of the book The Little Stranger

The Little Stranger

Sarah Waters

Dr. Faraday, a country physician who built a decent life for himself, is called to attend to a patient at the Hundreds Hall, which has been home to the Ayres family for over two hundred years. The Georgian house, once impeccable, is now falling apart – and so are the Ayres. They are struggling to keep up with the changes in society, while also dealing with the strange happenings taking place in their home. Dr. Faraday finds much more than he ever expected in Hundreds Hall, and attempts to make sense of the ghostly events that unfold. The brilliant combination of the supernatural and high society in The Little Stranger reflects the evil and the social upheaval of the class system in postwar Britain.

The cover of the book Time's a Thief

Time’s a Thief

B. G. Firmani

Francesca “Chess” Varani experiences the gritty ins-and-outs of college life at Barnard in mid-eighties New York in B. G. Firmani’s novel Time’s a Thief. She grows up quickly as she encounters everything from toxic friendships, damaging love affairs, and difficult decisions that change her future. As more and more time passes, she finds herself caught up in the choices she’s made, and perhaps more importantly, the ones she didn’t. Chess is always looking back, always wanting something more than she has. When she accepts a job at the Marr-Löwenstein house in the wealthy West Village, she finds more than she ever expected, and discovers what happens when two very different worlds collide.

The cover of the book Empty Mansions

Empty Mansions

Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell, Jr.

Empty Mansions reveals the ins and outs of the mysterious life of Huguette Clark, the daughter of self-made copper industrialist W. A. Clark. Huguette grew up in the largest house in New York City, with a remarkable fortune. But instead of keeping the money to herself, she devoted her life to sharing her wealth with friends and strangers. Readers will be introduced to her distinct family, her French boyfriend, her nurse who received more than $30 million in gifts, and the greedy relatives who wanted nothing more than to get their hands on Huguette’s fortune. Filled with beautiful illustrations and photographs, Empty Mansions is a captivating story of a misfit in the highest order – an extraordinary member of the Gilded Age who lived life on her own terms, despite the judgment of others.

The cover of the book The Custom of the Country

The Custom of the Country

Edith Wharton

This fascinating story follows heroine Undine Spragg – a vain, spoiled, selfish, but irresistible Midwestern girl who attempts to ascend through the ranks of New York City society. Wharton takes readers on a journey from New York to Europe, detailing Undine’s many marriages, affairs, and schemes. Undine doesn’t learn any lessons as she moves through life, and doesn’t go through any profound changes. She continues to care only about her own wealth and power, and finds pleasure in creating chaos. Edith Wharton’s The Custom of the Country is a clever, satirical, and detailed examination of the exploits and foolishness of the modern upper class.

The cover of the book Love in a Cold Climate

Love in a Cold Climate

Nancy Mitford

This romantic comedy depicts what aristocratic life was like in England between the wars. It follows the life of Polly Hampton, a beautiful, young noblewoman who has been set up with the perfect marriage by her mother. She is expected to do her duty without question, and be a proper lady. But Polly finds England to be quite boring, especially after experiencing life in India, where her father served as Viceroy. When she reveals a long-kept secret, she shatters her mother’s dreams and loses her inheritance. With her newfound independence, Polly is free to do as she pleases, and her parents seek to find a new heir. Everyone eventually gets a happy ending – even if it’s not what they expected.